The best bits

Sometime in October we decided that we were going to keep Christmas really simple this year, and just do the best bits. So over a few evening meals (and telephone calls to Ben at university) we established what everyone’s very favourite parts of Christmas were, and got rid of the rest.

Some of the choices were things I could have anticipated: the roast dinner is staying, as are most of the trimmings. John and Seb – its biggest fans – are taking care of that. A visit from Father Christmas is mandatory and, as I told the children, fine by me as I have nothing to do with it. Ben and Ilse insist that it wouldn’t be Christmas without an afternoon spent watching Christmas films, eating lebkuchen and making paper chains from the recycling bin. Fliss loves snuggling up to watch whatever children’s special the BBC has conjured up, as they are always her favourite books from when she was little. There will be presents. And candles. And I am going to boil and glaze a ham on Christmas Eve, and serve it with garlicky potatoes dauphinoise and a mountain of steamed brussels sprout tops. That’s my favourite moment.

While we have never gone in for extravagant Christmases, this one feels especially relaxed. We’ve gone to the odd advent service, including the school one, held in York Minster, where Fliss sang in the choir. John and I made a list and did all the Christmas shopping in town in a single afternoon. We took the children in a couple of weeks ago to enjoy the lights and buy their little gifts to one another. By far and away the biggest effort I’ve made this Christmas has been in all the knitting, and that is neither stressful nor a chore in my book. We’ve put up the children’s advent calendars and a few strings of fairy lights, and the house feels just a little more twinkly than usual. I haven’t even been tempted by a poinsettia, happy instead with the cyclamen blooming festively on the dining table.

What I am looking forward to now is the coming weekend, when Ben comes home for the holidays and we’ll all be together again. There will be a couple of highly excitable days where the house gets festooned in paper chains and greenery from the garden. We’ll decorate the tree on Christmas Eve and I’ll enjoy watching Ilse’s face as the presents emerge from hiding places all around the house.

And after the day itself, I’m looking forward to a few long walks, a bit of non-gift knitting and probably the start of a new scrap quilt. Lazy mornings and lackadaisical breakfast-come-lunches. Long evenings in front of the fire. Watching the children play endless rounds of Monopoly and – the new favourite – Dungeons and Dragons. Just a restful winter holiday at home, really.

Before you start thinking that this all sounds a little too lovely to be true, I can assure you that there are bound to be some squabbles, let-downs and grumpy moments. There are also, given my total lack of a list, bound to be some things that I’ve forgotten (crackers? pudding?). I’ve just decided not to care, because nobody else seems to. After all, as long as we’ve all got our very best bits of the festival, everyone should be happy, and that is probably the best bit of all as far as I’m concerned.

Madeleine

Are you doing anything differently this Christmas, or do you do it exactly the same every year? However you’re doing it – or whether you’re not celebrating at all – may I wish you a peaceful, restful break.

2 thoughts on “The best bits”

  1. You speak from my heart Madeline. We’ve whittled down our own Christmas to the bare essentials (essential for us) a long time ago. Not in a conscious effort like you, it just happened, slowly slowly. But then, Christmas was never that big where and when I grew up (Switzerland) and I never quite got into the swing of what is the perfect British Christmas. I think our Christmasses are very alike. Good company, good food and no plans other than walking the dog. No doubt plenty of bickering (the youngest) and maybe a disagreement or two with one or the other teenager but that’s part of being a family.

    Thanks for the pointer, we have no crackers yet. I can’t stand those but they are someone else’s essential Christmas ingredient 🙂

    Have a lovely Christmas x

    1. Thanks Christina – and happy Christmas to you, too! The more people I speak to, the more I realise are choosing a simpler Christmas this year, so we’re in good company. Like you, I didn’t grow up in the UK so don’t have all the associations of a big British Christmas either. I particularly like Christmas Eve, to be honest – do you celebrate on Christmas Eve in Switzerland? x

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