Snow Day jumper knitalong part four: the sleeves

Hello there – ready for the next part of our knitalong? This time you’re going to master two skills: knitting in rib and increasing. Yes, it’s time for the sleeves.

The first thing you need to do is cast on the number of stitches that the pattern tells you to for your size. Then you need to establish your rib.

All that ‘2×2 rib’ means is knit two stitches, then purl two stitches, then repeat these four stitches until you get to the end of the row. So you need to knit the first two stitches as I’ve done below:

Your yarn will be at the back. Bring it to the front, like so:

and purl the next two stitches.

Take  your yarn to the back again to knit the next two stitches, like so:

then bring it forward again to purl the two stitches after that, and so on and so forth until you have reached the end of your row. You now have one row of ribbing on your needle. Voila! You can see mine below.

Turn your work and rib the next row, as established. This just means that you knit into all the knit stitches (which look like they are wearing little v-neck jumpers) and purl all the purl stitches (which look like they are wearing turtlenecks). You’ll find that you knit two, purl two, all the way along the row. Keep working back and forth like this until you have an inch of ribbing. Make sure that you finish with a wrong side row. It’s impossible to tell right and wrong sides from ribbing alone, so a good trick is to remember that your cast on tail will be dangling from under the last stitches you knit on a wrong side row, and the first that you knit in a right side row. You can see that I’m just about to start a right side row in the photo below.

So that’s the ribbing mastered.

Now it’s time to start increasing. If we didn’t increase, our sleeves would either be too baggy round the cuff or too small around the top of your arm. But increasing is easy. While we’re increasing, we want to keep our ribbing looking good, so follow the instructions to the letter.

First, you need to purl the first stitch of the next row. I know that it’s a knit stitch, but you need to purl it. Trust me. You can see mine here:

You’ll notice that there’s only one knit stitch now, before the next pair of purl stitches. Move your working yarn to the back of your work. What you’re going to do is make another knit stitch, which is known as making one knitwise. You do this by knitting into the strand of yarn which runs between the knit stitch on your left needle, and the stitch you’ve just purled on your right needle. In the photo below, my pencil is pointing at the strand of yarn in question.

What you need to do is insert your left needle under this strand from the back to the front. The strand should now be lying over your left needle, like so:

Now you’re going to knit this strand of yarn as if it was a normal stitch. So you want to insert your right hand needle under the strand from front to back, and left to right. It can be a bit awkward at first, but don’t worry, it is right. You can make it easier by pulling more of the strand forward over the needle with your left index finger, to make a bigger gap for your right needle to get in under. Once inserted, it should look like this:

Okay? Now knit it, just like a normal stitch. You’ll now have a knit stitch and a purl stitch on your right hand needle, and the next stitch on your left hand needle will be a knit stitch too. Here’s mine:

That’s it. You just made a stitch, knitwise. Work the rest of the row in the established rib, stopping one stitch before the end. That means you’ll knit the next stitch, then purl two, knit two all the way to the end of the row, stopping before the last stitch, which will be a purl stitch. Leave it on your left needle. We’re going to make a new purl stitch from the strand of yarn lying between this last stitch on the left needle, and the one you’ve just purled on your right needle. My pencil is pointing at the strand in question:

Now, making one purlwise (for that is what we are about to do) follows exactly the same principles as making one knitwise, only we insert our needles differently. This time, you want to insert your left hand needle from the front to the back of the strand of yarn.

Once you’ve done that, you insert your right hand needle into the strand from back to front, right to left, ready to purl:

Then purl as normal. There! You just made one purlwise.

Knit the last stitch. Yes, I know that it’s a purl stitch, but if you look at your right hand needle you’ll find that you’ve already got a pair of purl stitches. So the final stitch of the row now needs to be a knit stitch. Here’s my completed row.

You’ll have noticed that, from left to right, the stitches are knit, then two purls, then two knits and so forth. This is correct.

Follow the pattern for the rest of the sleeve, paying close attention to whether each increase is knitwise or purlwise, and whether you need to knit or purl the first and last stitches of each increase row.

When you get to the top of your sleeve, you need to bind off in rib. I cannot emphasise enough how important it is that you BIND OFF LOOSELY. You’d be hard pressed to bind off too loosely and to be honest, it wouldn’t really matter if you did. No-one is going to see this top edge as it is going to be sewn to the inside of the jumper (sweater). Bind off too tightly, though, and you won’t be able to get your arm into your sleeve. This is because the ribbing needs to be able to stretch right across that top edge, and if there isn’t lots of extra yarn available for it to stretch out nice and wide, it simply won’t be able to. So be generous with your yarn, and keep things looser than you think can possibly be necessary.

The other thing you need to know about binding off in rib is that you have to keep to the purl two, knit two pattern whilst binding off. That’s perfectly straightforward, but I’ll show you how it’s done anyway.

First, purl two stitches NICE AND LOOSELY. See below how the purl stitches on the right needle are loose?

With the left needle, lift the first stitch that you purled over the other one and off the end of the needle – just binding off normally. Resist the urge to pull anything tight:

Now, because we’ve just purled two stitches, the next stitch will be a knit stitch. You don’t even have to keep count; just have a look to see what the next stitch will be. You can see in the photo above that it’s wearing a v-neck (rather than a turtleneck) so it’s a knit stitch. Move your yarn to the back, ready to knit this stitch, like so:

and knit it.

Now you’re going to bind off the purl stitch which is sitting to the right of the knit stitch. Just lift it over and off the end of the needle, keeping everything very very loose, so that your work looks like mine, below.

The next stitch is another knit stitch, so knit it very very loosely. Fight the urge to pull that working yarn taut!

Then bind off the previous stitch. In this photo you begin to get a sense of how loose my stitches are – can you see how big that most recently bound off stitch is? That’s just what we’re after.

The next stitch is wearing a turtleneck, so I know I need to purl it, and so I move my working yarn to the front again like so:

and I purl it very loosely and bind off the preceding stitch and so on and so forth.

Once you’ve bound off a few stitches, just take a moment to check that you are binding off loosely enough. To do this, pull on your bound off edge and see how far it stretches. If you’ve done things loosely enough, the ribbing will be able to stretch to its full extent. In the photo I am stretching mine, and it is lovely and stretchy.

Keep binding off very loosely in rib all the way to the end of the row, stopping every now and then to check that everything is still lovely and loose and stretchy. When you get to the final stitch, as shown in the photo below, cut the yarn with a long tail and pull it through that stitch as you take it off the needle.

Now for the moment of truth. (Don’t worry, if you’ve kept things loose this is guaranteed to be fine.) If you take a look at the ‘Making Up’ section of the pattern, it tells you how far to measure for the armhole down the front and back. Multiply this number by two (for my size it says 7.5″, so that makes 15″.) Using your tape measure or ruler, see how far the top of your sleeve will stretch. You can see from the photo that mine stretched to at least 17.5″ without pinging out from under the speaker that was holding the far end down while I took the photograph. That’s brilliant, because I only need it to stretch to 15″. It’s got stretch to spare!

That’s the first sleeve done. Well done! Making the second will be a walk in the park, now. Happy knitting, and see you again for the final tutorial next Friday: making up.

Madeleine

How are you getting on with your Snow Day?

A small, sustainable wardrobe: how to buy new

A series about the clothes we wear and the impact they have both on us and the world around us.

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I know, I know. Shopping is the antithesis of having a small wardrobe. Buying new does not bode well for sustainability. But sometimes you need to buy something, and you need to buy it new.

I don’t use the word need lightly. I’m not talking about the perfect pair of shoes to go with a new dress, or the cruel temptation in the latest catalogue to plop fatly onto my hall floor. Not that I’m immune to such things: we are all human. No, I’m talking underwear and base layers. Tights, socks, thermal vests, bras and knickers. The things that I do genuinely think we need to buy new.

I don’t actually have any qualms about buying all of these things brand new, because I know that I will wear these basics over and over again until they are fit for nothing but the compost heap. What I do sometimes struggle with is how to buy them. Do I shop ethically but online, and risk a sea of plastic packaging? Do I worry about the delivery truck driving just to my house, when I could collect something from M&S on my bike? Do I spend more on my underthings than a couple of good meals? Is that obscene? Should I buy one set for me and one for charity? (Nobody donates underthings to charity, new or used). What do I do with the old ones? How many do I need? What colours? Seriously, I could go on. But life is short, and there are more important things to agonise about, so I have a few rules of thumb. In no particular order, these are personal my New Things purchasing guidelines.

Number one: buy organic if you can. Especially if you are buying cotton. Contrary to popular belief, buying organic isn’t about you. Quite frankly, with the amount of toxins sloshing about our daily lives I really don’t think that the residues of pesticides on our clothing – especially after multiple washes – are going to have a significant impact on our health. But they do have an enormous impact on the health and wellbeing of the people who grow cotton. They also have a tremendous impact on the health of the soil in which it is grown, and the surrounding ecosystem.

Number two: buy from a company that you trust to treat its workers fairly. Again, this is about people. I want to know – not just hope – that the people putting my clothes together are paid properly and treated with dignity.

Number three: buy less. Just buy what you need (and maybe a second set to donate, if you feel that way inclined). I have enough to get me through a week. I don’t need more than that. Let your laundry habits be your guide.

Number four: a little forethought goes a long way. I know it sounds dull, but sitting down and working out how many skin-coloured sets vs. other-coloured sets you actually need is a vital part of buying less. Work out which colours of tights will enable to you actually get dressed in the mornings. And for goodness’ sake, make sure you know what’s comfortable.

Number five: go local and go small. If you can buy what you need locally, then do. It saves on transport emissions as well as packaging. If you can’t, try to buy from a smaller company with ethical credentials. Most of us don’t have time to investigate the business ethics of every company we buy from, but you can get a sense of whether ethics are a priority or just a greenwashing exercise. Oh, and ask for plastic-free packaging if they don’t offer it as standard.

Number six: love what you buy. Don’t buy something that you don’t particularly like, just because it’s fair trade or organic or whatever. Hold out for something that you are going to enjoy putting on week after week until it falls apart. Otherwise you’ll be back on the shopping treadmill before you know it.

Number seven: aftercare. Now that you’ve bought it, take care of it. Wool and silk last far, far longer with a bit of attention. Wash things by hand, or at the very least, on the delicates cycle with some wool/ silk detergent. It takes far less time than you think.

I tend to do a little overhaul every spring and autumn and this autumn I’ve not had to buy much new. Some underthings and the thermal vest pictured above. None of it was cheap, but I’ve been wearing those vests for years and know exactly how long it’ll last. We’re being advised not to buy anything that we won’t wear at least 30 times, which is a very achievable target. I’ve worked my vests out at 135 days of wear – and that’s a conservative estimate. After a few seasons, it’ll be in no state for anything but to be snipped up and mixed into the compost heap. So I think it’s worth it, on all sorts of levels.

As I said, there are other things that I buy new, from time to time. No doubt they will be the subject of another post. Really, though, the same rules apply. That, and just trying your best, and not being too hard on yourself if you get it wrong and find yourself wondering what to do with that novelty PVC catsuit on November 1st. You know the drill. Only 29 more outings to go. Ready to do the school run in style?

Madeleine

Have I missed anything out? What are your rules of thumb for buying new?

Snow Day knitalong part three: the front

Hello again! Ready to start the front? The weekend would be a great time to work your first few bobbles, so that you’ve got them down pat before the week begins again. Then you’ll be able to knit the rest of the front during the coming week, knowing exactly what you’re doing.

To start with, the front is exactly like the back. If you want a reminder of how the bottom hem and notches are worked, take another look at last week’s knitalong tutorial. Just bear in mind that the pattern specifies a different number of rows for the front and back notches – you don’t do as many for the front. Once you’ve finished the notch section, it’s time to start on the bobbles.

You begin by knitting however many stitches the pattern specifies for your size, in order to reach the point where you will make your first bobble. So take a moment to knit to that place, and then have a quick read of all the bobble instructions before making your first bobble.

You’re going to make a bobble out of the next stitch. In the photo below, the metal needle is pointing at the stitch that you are going to make the bobble out of.

Knit the stitch, but don’t slide it off the left needle. In the photo below, the newly knitted stitch is on the right needle, but the original stitch is still on the left needle (being held on by my index finger). You’ve just made two stitches out of one original stitch.

Put your yarn to the front of your work, so that you are ready to purl.

Now purl into the same stitch (the one that my index finger is touching in the photo above). You can see my inserted needle, ready to purl that stitch, in the photo below.

 

Again, don’t slide this stitch off your needle. You can now see, as in the photo below, that you have two new stitches (one knit and one purl) on your right needle, and still that same original stitch on your left needle (my index finger is holding it in the photo below).

Move your yarn to the back of your work again, as in the photo below.

and knit into this same stitch again, as you can see me doing below.

This time, you are finally allowed to slide that stitch off your left needle once you’ve knitted it. So you can see, below, that my thumb is indicating the three new stitches that we’ve made out of that single initial stitch. There’s a purl stitch in the centre, and a knit stitch on either side of it.

Okay? So you’ve turned one stitch into three. This provides the breadth of the bobble. Now we need to give it some height. To do this, we’re going to work just these three new stitches for a couple of rows of stocking stitch, as follows:

Turn your work so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front, so that you are set up like the photo below.

Purl the first three stitches. (They are the ones that you have just worked.)

Turn your work again so that the right side is facing you, and move your yarn to the back, as you can see below.

Knit these same three stitches.

Turn your work again so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front once more, as shown in the photo below.

 

Purl the same three stitches again.

Finally, turn your work so that the right side is facing, and move your yarn to the back again, as shown below.

This is the special bit. You’re going to knit all three of these same stitches together into one stitch. To do this, you literally knit the three stitches as if they were one. You can see that I’m doing this in the photo below. In fact, treating all three stitches as one even makes it look as if I’m only knitting one stitch. I’m not; my needle is inserted through all three stitches knitwise (i.e. as if knitting normally) at the same time.

Wrap your working yarn to make a knit stitch (as usual), move the right needle under the left (as usual) and slide all three stitches off the left needle – just as if you were knitting one ordinary stitch.

That’s it! You’ve made a bobble! It’ll look more like a proper bobble once you’ve worked a couple more rows. For now, just knit a few more stitches, keeping count so that you know when to make the next bobble. In the photo below you can see that I’ve knit my bobble, with all that bulk below and to the right of it, and then three more normal knit stitches.

I assure you that it’ll look much more like a proper bobble in a couple of rows’ time, at which point you’ll be able to give it a prod and a poke from behind to make it more rounded and full. For now though, just concentrate on getting to the end of the row. Remember, count your stitches and stop when it’s time to make the next bobble.

By the time you get to the end of your row, it’ll look something like this:

My empty needle is pointing at one of the bobbles.

Carry on in stocking stitch (knit the right side rows, purl the wrong side rows) for the specified number of rows, then work the next bobble row in exactly the same way. You’ll notice that on the next bobble row there are fewer bobbles and more knit stitches in between them.

Carry on knitting the front of your jumper until you reach the length specified for your size in the pattern, or your desired length (but only if you bought extra wool to allow for extra length). Don’t worry which row of the bobble-making pattern you finish on; it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that you make a wrong side (even numbered) row the last one you work.

Now it’s time to shape the neckline. We’re going to do this in a particularly simple way, with just a hint of shaping to allow the front neck to lie fractionally lower than the back. You’ll find that the neckline naturally curves gently into a lovely boatneck shape the first time you wear it.

Knit the whole next row, and turn your work, ready to purl. The pattern will tell you how many stitches to purl for your size; purl only this number of stitches and stop. It will look like this:

 

Now turn your work, make sure that your yarn is at the back, ready to knit, and knit the same (small number of) stitches back again.

Turn your work again, and purl the same stitches again. Your work should now look like mine does below, with the small section you’ve just worked a couple of rows longer than the rest of the neckline.

Now you are going to carry on purling the rest of the row, but you need to be really careful with the next stitch. Purl it really loosely, so that the longer section that you’ve just created will be able to stand up higher than the middle bit of the neckline. You’ll know that you’ve done it well if there’s just  the littlest of little holes to show where the join is. The needle is pointing at mine in the photo below.

Can you see how the fabric to the left of it is a couple of rows longer than the fabric to the right? By leaving that stitch nice and loose, the longer part of the neck will be able to extend straight up when we bind it off in a minute.

So, you’ve now purled all the way across the top of the front and are about to work the other raised shoulder bit. Knit the number of stitches specified for your size in the pattern, and stop. It will look like this:

Turn your work, bring your yarn to the front and purl those same few stitches back again. Now turn your work again and bind off the same number of stitches.

You’ll find that the last stitch to be bound off will be joined to the lower part of the neckline. Again, you need to make sure that this stitch is nice and loose so that the longer part of the front can stand proud of the lower part.

Knit all the way across the row. Then turn your work and, in purl, bind off the same small number of stitches specified in the pattern. Leaving a nice long tail, cut your yarn. Your front will now look like this:

Can you see the two bits that stick up at either end? They are the shoulders of your jumper.

You will need your needles to knit the sleeves next, so transfer the live stitches to a spare needle, stitch holder or length of spare yarn. That’s the front done!

Madeleine

How are you enjoying knitting your Snow Day? Any questions or feedback? Please let me know in the comments!

 

 

Snow Day knitalong part two: the back

Hello again! Happy Friday! It’s time for the second part of our knitalong: the back. You’ve had a bit of practice casting on and knitting while you were making your swatch, so this should be a breeze. In fact, if you get the first 26 rows done over the weekend, you’ll have lots of lovely mindless stocking stitch to relax with in the evenings throughout the coming week.

The first thing you need to do is cast all the stitches onto your larger needle (the one you swatched for). This just makes knitting that first row much easier, as the stitches will be a bit looser than if you cast them onto your smaller needle. However, the smaller needle is used to knit the rest of the hem. So you literally hold the larger needle (with all the cast on stitches on it) in one hand, and the smaller needle in your other hand. I’m right handed and knit in the UK way, so in the photo below the cast on stitches are on the larger needle (on the left), and I’ve just started to knit them all across onto my smaller needle (on the right).

Done? Right, now before you forget, put that larger needle away and pick up the other smaller needle. You should now be working exclusively with your pair of smaller needles. The pattern tells you to knit some rows of garter stitch. Just to remind you, that means that you knit every row. Don’t purl anything.

Once you’ve knitted the required number of rows of garter stitch, you’re ready to work on the notches. In this next section, you’re going to be knitting stocking stitch in the centre of the work, and garter stitch at either end. It’s actually really easy.

You also need to start using your larger needles again. So pick up one of your large needles and use it to work all the stitches of the following row.

We start on the right side, and just knit the whole row. Put the smaller needle (that you’ve just emptied of stitches) to one side, and pick up your other larger needle. You’re going to be working with your pair of larger needles for the rest of the back. Turn your work.

Then, on the wrong side, you need to knit the first five stitches only. In the photo below, that’s precisely where I’m up to. Can you see how the first five stitches are still in garter stitch? That’s because we’re still knitting both sides of those first five stitches.

However, we want the central section to be stocking stitch, so you need to purl all the way across the row until you are five stitches before the end. Don’t forget to bring your yarn to the front of your work before you start purling, like so:

When you get to those last five stitches, stop. Move your yarn to the back of your work again, ready to knit. Then knit those last five stitches, to create the garter stitch notch on the other side of the back.

Take a look at your work, without turning it. From the wrong side, which you’ve just finished working, it will look like the photo below. Those are the first five knit stitches (on the right), and then the purl stitches stretching off to the left. There will be five more purl stitches on the far left edge of your knitting.

Turn your work, and knit the whole row. By the time you finish this row, your work should look like the photo below, on the right side (the side you’ve just finished working).

Can you see the garter notch beginning to emerge on the right hand side? Work a few more rows (in the same way as the previous two) and it’ll be much clearer:

Carry on in this manner until you’ve worked as many rows as the pattern tells you to. Then stop and have a celebratory drink/ dance/ pat on the back. That’s the hardest part of the back done.

Now all you need to do is work the rest of the back in stocking stitch until it reaches the required length (see the pattern to find out what this is in your size). That means that you knit all the stitches on the right side and purl all the stitches on the wrong side. Easy.

Once you reach the length specified in the pattern (or the length you want, provided you bought extra wool), you need to bind off the first few stitches. The pattern will tell you how many for your size. I’m going to bind off nine.

Knit the first two stitches as normal:

then insert your left needle into the stitch furthest to the right, on the right needle:

and pull it over the other stitch and off the end of the needle, so that it is underneath the other stitch like so:

and then pull your left hand needle out of that stitch. It won’t unravel, because it’s been bound around the other stitch on the right hand needle. Clever, no?

Continue to bind off stitches, until you’ve bound off the right number (nine, for the size I’m making in the photos). The important bit to remember is that you’re not counting the stitches as you knit them, but when you pass them  over the end of the needle and bind them off. You’ll end up with one stitch on your right needle and lots still on your left needle, like so:

Knit all the way along the rest of the row until you only have the number of stitches that you want to bind off remaining on your left needle. Can you see that I have nine (below)?

Knit two more stitches. You’ll see, below, that I only have seven stitches remaining on my left needle. I haven’t bound any stitches off on this side of the back, yet. The pencil is pointing at the first stitch that you are going to bind off on this side:

Lift it over the other stitch and the end of the needle, as you would normally bind off, so that you have one bound off stitch. The pencil is pointing at the bound off stitch, below.

Now knit another stitch from the left needle to the right, like so:

In the photo below the pencil is pointing at the next stitch that you are going to bind off.

Bind it off. Continue in this manner, knitting one stitch and then binding off the previous stitch, until you reach the end of the row. You’ll be left with one stitch on its own at the end of your right needle, and nothing on your left needle. Cut your yarn (with a long tail) and pull it through the final stitch to secure it as you pull the stitch off the needle. Your knitting should look like this:

And that’s it!

You’ll need to use your larger needles again, so transfer your live (not-bound-off) stitches onto a stitch holder or something. I tend to thread a length of scrap yarn (in a different colour) onto a tapestry needle, and use it to pull the scrap yarn through all the stitches before taking them off the knitting needle. Then unthread the tapestry needle, and tie the two ends of the scrap yarn together. Put the back of the jumper aside for the time being.

Next Friday, we’ll start working on the front. Have a good week, and happy knitting.

Madeleine

How are you getting on? Please feel free to leave any questions or updates in the comments below. I’d love to know what colours people are making this in.

And breathe

What I needed, after the excitement and busyness of last week, was a breather. A quiet weekend. A chance to pause and take stock. And, in a funny sort of way, that is exactly what I got.

A chance to set things straight around the place, to plan the meals for the week ahead, to empty the fridge into the soup pot and refill it with fresh veg. To chat with my children, home and away, and share a new project with them each. Somehow, in between the Saturday comings and goings to the market and the ballet studio, the house was cleaned. I read a novel – a whole, 595 page novel – in one weekend: a treat which is unlikely to be soon repeated. Seb baked a seed cake. Ilse, between piano practice and dance lessons and copious amounts of homework, started a snood with the leftovers from Fliss’ Snow Day and presented it to me, last night, complete. I added a few more rows to my Lionberry shawl. John finished sanding the fiddly bits on that ugly old chair I’d brought home, and gave it a coat of wax. It was to go in our bedroom but looks better in my studio, so there it’ll stay for now. Its seat has been recovered deliberately lackadaisically, using one of the fat quarters purchased at the mill, back in August. I want to be able to whip the fabric off again, and use it in a quilt, in a new year’s flurry of making.

Mother and Father joined us for our Sunday roast, and it was one of those glorious affairs which seemed to cook itself, everyone taking care of just one of two parts of the process. Seb peeled a sinkful of spuds, and put them on to boil. Fliss picked the fattest pears from the tree and tossed them in brown sugar and cinnamon, before Ilse topped the fruit with an almond sponge, to make an Exmoor In-and-Out. I cut vegetables from the garden, and left them ready in a pan. And John pulled it all together: roasting the potatoes, making a gravy, carving the rested bird. By the time the girls’ gently fragrant pudding was brought to the table, I felt entirely myself again.

Yes, it was one of those weekends where we pottered about and everything we did was like a deep and calming breath. There is something so pleasing in the familiar, when you are regaining your balance. Make soup – inhale. Cover a chair – exhale. On it goes, through bookish cuddles on the settee and the sound of someone making steady progress up and down their scales. Family life, with all its familiar rhythms, has restored my bumping heart to something steady once again.

This morning, at the start of a brand new day, new week, new month, I got things ready to begin again. While seeing to the hens, I picked a fresh bouquet of cosmos to grace the windowsill in my little studio. I tidied the debris of the last design into the children’s craft cupboard so that my basket is waiting, empty, for the wool I’ve ordered to arrive. The desk is clear. There is a fresh title in my design book, gracing a clean white page, ready to record the calculations of the day. Colours have been chosen, little details settled upon, test knitters primed and waiting. A pot of tea, the radio for company: there is comfort in the familiar. A deep breath, a clean space, and I am ready to begin again.

Madeleine

And you? What did you do this weekend?

Snow Day knitalong part one: gathering and swatching

I have been bowled over by the response to this pattern! Thank you all so much for your positive comments; it is a delight to read each and every one. I am beyond excited about the sheer number of people who have requested a copy, and so looking forward to seeing Snow Day jumpers popping up here, on Ravelry and on Instagram.

As the response is so big, can I ask you to be patient if your pattern doesn’t arrive immediately? Please give me 24 hours to send one out, and if you haven’t received one by then, just drop me a friendly email or a comment here and I’ll sort it out. Right, back to the knitalong…

Welcome to the first part of the Snow Day jumper knitalong! I’m so excited that you’re taking part, whether you’re an old hand or are newer to knitting.  The pattern specifically designed as a first jumper (sweater) pattern for newer knitters, with a little shaping for a flattering fit and a bit of texture for interest. If you’re new to the pattern and need convincing that you can knit this, read this post. The rest of us will wait right here for you.

Feeling more confident? Excellent! The next thing to do is to get your hands on the pattern, which is available entirely free from today until 31 October 2018. All you need to do is leave a comment (below), and I’ll email it to you as a PDF. Needless to say, your email address will only be visible to me, and I won’t use it to send you anything else at all. (Not even knitalong updates, which you might actually want. To receive email notifications of all my posts including those, sign up in the Join Our Community box in the sidebar/ near the bottom of your phone screen.)

Now that you’ve got the pattern, you’ll want to know a little bit more about the recommended yarn, and alternatives to this. Obviously I’ve knit this jumper twice, once in the recommended Drops Alaska, and once in my own handspun. Both were 100% wool, because it provides the structure and warmth that this pattern calls for. I ordered mine from here, and was very taken with both the mustard and dark turquoise colour ways. But my Drops version wasn’t intended for me, so I let Fliss choose the colour she liked the most. She chose the grey pink, which I must admit I wasn’t all that excited by in its balled state. Once I started to knit with it, though, it revealed all sorts of lovely marly qualities, with strands of yarn varying in colour from deep pink to purple to grey, with flecks of navy here and there. In the end, I liked it very much. Not all of their colours are mixed like this, but the ones that are are stunning.

I chose Drops for several reasons, the first and foremost being its affordability. I would really encourage you to knit this jumper with real wool, but some wool is really expensive. I’ve used Drops for several projects, including (but not limited to) Fliss’ Foxgloves cardigan, Seb’s Stars jumper, and Ben’s Big Softie. It washes and wears very well, and is a pleasure to work with.

However, I hope that the fact that I also made this in a wibbly-wobbly handspun gives you the confidence – particularly you more seasoned knitters – to go off and use whatever yarn you deem appropriate. Of course I can’t be responsible if it doesn’t turn out exactly like my Drops one. But that’s all part of the fun! I can’t wait to see what you choose, and how it turns out. You need an aran weight wool (17 stitches and 22 rows for a 10x10cm swatch).

As you’ll see, the pattern tells you how much yarn you’ll need for a hip-length jumper in your size. If you want to knit a longer jumper – and there’s no reason why you can’t, and this would be lovely as a tunic – order an extra ball or two of yarn. If in doubt, buy extra, as you can’t always get yarn from the same dye lot again, which is incredibly frustrating when you are four inches from the top of the second sleeve. Don’t ask me how I know that.

Once you’ve got your wool, you’ll need to determine what size needles to work with. Cast on using the size recommended on the ball band – 5mm for Drops Alaska. Work in stocking stitch as this is the main stitch used (knit 1 row, turn, purl next row) for 22 rows. This is enough to establish the width of your knitted swatch. Gently uncurl the edges and hold it flat, without stretching it at all. Measure the width. It should be 10cm almost exactly – you can see from the photo below that mine is.

But what if it isn’t? Not to worry. We all knit with different tension, and even needles purporting to be the same size can differ. All you do is go up a needle size (if your swatch was under 10cm), or down a size (if it was over 10cm).  Knit two rows (no purling) to create a garter stitch line across your swatch. It should now look like the photo below (see that row of purl stitches at the very top?).

Carry on in stocking stitch again, until you’ve done another 22 rows and can measure your swatch again. Keep adjusting your needle size until your swatch measures 10 cm across. Here you can see that by changing to 6mm needles, my 17 stitches yielded over 11cm, instead of 10. Needle size makes a big difference.

 Don’t worry overly about how many rows you knit per 10cm, as long as you are in the right ballpark (22 rows per 10cm). The pattern will tell you how long each part needs to be, not how many rows to knit (apart from at the hem and neckline). The important thing is to use the right sized needles to be able to consistently knit 10cm across with 17 stitches. I used 4mm needles with my handspun, and 5mm needles with the Drops Alpaca. As you can see, wool varies. As long as your gauge is right, your jumper will fit.

You will also need a pair of needles 1mm smaller than the size you have decided upon. You don’t need to swatch with these needles, as they are just for the collar and hem. For example, because my larger needles (the ones I swatched for) are 5mm, I’m going to use 4mm needles every time the pattern calls for my smaller needles.

 You can cast off your swatch, wash and block it, if you like, but I must admit that I never do. Instead, I frog it, wind it back on the ball, and cast on again for the back.

Speaking of the back, that tutorial – including photos – will be available next week, same time, same place. Hopefully you’ll have gathered your wool and needles and made your swatch by then. If you have any questions at all, you can either post them in the comments below, or send me an email direct at mrscecilygraham@gmail.com. In the meantime, why not snap the odd photo of your parcel of wool arriving/ swatching in front of the fire/ general knitting love and send them to me so that I can include them in next week’s post? Alternatively, you can use the hashtag snowdayjumper on instagram, or add your photos to your Ravelry account. I look forward to seeing all the yarn that everyone chooses!

Madeleine

Who are you making your Snow Day for? And is it your first ever jumper pattern?

Introducing Snow Day, completely free

My first commercially-available knitting pattern is ready for release. May I introduce you to Snow Day? A simple, modern textured knit, Snow Day is a sweater pattern aimed at beginners and experienced knitters alike.

I demand a lot of my knitwear. It needs to be flattering. It needs thoughtful details, to make it stand out from the crowd. If intended to be worn in the depths of winter, as Snow Day is, it needs to be warm. But it also needs to be soft and robust and made of natural materials. The Snow Day jumper ticks all those boxes, and I have to admit, I love it.

It is also, dare I say, very stylish. What with its elegant boat neck and bobble-stitch texture on the front, it brings together some of the most timeless elements of what we’re wearing now. The notches on the side seams, along with the longer back section, echo many of the sweaters available from high end stores. And those ribbed sleeves, particularly when knitted long with thumb-holes to pull over your hands, are the cosiest I’ve ever had. It is most certainly fit for a day in the snow.

This is a sweater with a mission. This is a First Sweater: the sweater that newer knitters can accomplish well and without tears. All my care and expertise lie behind each detail: the simple breadth of the neckline that requires no picking up of stitches, the easy-to-attach drop sleeves. I’ve said it before: if you can knit and purl and cast on and bind off, you can make this. Because those are the only prerequisite skills.

As promised, the pattern is written twice. First, each instruction is written in the standard knitting-pattern format. Then, beneath each coded direction, is the translation. Each italicised translation contains the same instruction written out in full, and extra information on how to accomplish it.

There are also five tutorials waiting to be published on consecutive Fridays, taking the beginner through each stage of the construction. We begin, this Friday, with choosing yarn and needles and making a swatch. I’ve deliberately left enough time for your parcel to arrive in the post. Then we move on through the back, the front, the sleeves and, finally, the making up. With every instruction comes a photograph, showing exactly what you need to do. Not that any of it is complicated. As I say, if you have basic knitting skills, you can definitely make this jumper.

Once I’d knit my handspun prototype, I cast on again in a different size and the recommended yarn. I could not be more pleased with the Drops Alaska. The springiness of the wool, combined with the round 3-ply yarn, results in a texture that positively pops. Fliss put it on for her photoshoot, and I had to persuade her out of it at bedtime. It is soft and thick and warm, and looks lovely with a t-shirt or blouse peeping above that sweeping neckline. Hers is knit in the smallest size – 32″ – and perfectly appropriate for a girl approaching her teens. Her version looks playful and modern and sweet.

Knit up in a neutral and worn without the tee, it is a far more grown-up affair. I’ve been wearing mine both ways. In fact, I’ve barely taken it off since the shoot.

John took the photographs on the beach at Sandsend, last Saturday afternoon. The waves were huge, egged on by the equinox, and as the only sunlight was in the shallow water, I pulled my wellies on and waded in. Needless to say, it wasn’t long until a particularly big wave got me, and for the second half of the shoot I was soaked from the waist down.

Which only goes to show what a versatile jumper this is. Throw on a gilet and a snood and I was toasty, despite the sloshing in my boots. From elegant to everyday to layered up for a chilly afternoon by the sea, this jumper fits the bill.

If you’d like to make one yourself, the pattern will be available completely free from Friday 28 September until Wednesday 31 October. The online tutorials will remain free, on this blog, indefinitely. You can take as much or as little time over this as you please.

I, for one, won’t be hanging around. There’s nothing I want to do more, in October, than curl up with a good pattern and a basket of yarn. If you feel the same way, pop back to the blog on Friday and leave a comment, and I’ll send you the pattern as a free PDF. My treat. And in the meantime, I’m looking forward to seeing all the different Snow Days produced in the weeks to come. I hope you’ll join us.

NB From 1 November 2018 onwards, the pattern will be downloadable directly from its Ravelry page.

Small pleasures

First, there is pleasure in giving. Fliss has been asking for a waxed fabric sandwich wrap all summer, and I finally made her one on Sunday evening. The best part was letting her choose whatever she wanted out of my fabric stash. She chose what is also my favourite: this beautiful vintage floral green, and I know it brings her as much pleasure every lunchtime as it would me. We are neither of us fans of the cumbersome, and a simple wrap-come-tablecloth that folds away into nothing beats a lunchbox any day.

Then there is also pleasure in deliberating. I don’t have much of a stash, as a rule, but I did a bit of shopping while we were in London to make up new pattern samples. The teal linen, which is heavy and rich with drape, was to be a new Sharpen Your Pencils dress, only now I’m dreaming of a new lined A-line skirt in it instead. The floral viscose was to be a Beat the Blues Blouse, but wouldn’t it make the most satisfying of secretly-lovely linings for my skirt? Extravagant, yes. But I think I might be persuaded.

On the more frugal side of things, plans for my scraps are evolving. This little heap of 2 1/2″ squares were to be a postage stamp quilt, and maybe they still will. Or perhaps they’ll be an English Paper Piecing project, instead. I’m thinking of a tea cosy constructed of tiny hexagons, nestled together to keep the pot warm. It is the sort of long slow project that I would like to reserve for weekend afternoons, before the sun slips away behind the hen house.

Speaking of hens, our little flock of chicks is not quite old enough to join the ladies in the big house, but it won’t be long. For now, they are taking it in turns to enjoy the garden. They set out with such determination, arguing over fallen apples and particularly satisfying scratching spots, before ending up in the inevitable chicken cuddle under a tree. Even when the grown girls are out and the little ones are safely in their run, the hens nestle up to the wire. Perhaps we could let them all out together, but I think the small ones aren’t quite big enough to deal with the jostling yet. Sorting out the pecking order can be a stressful business. Everyone is happy, just now, so we’ll keep it this way for a while yet.

Generally, one or the other of us keeps an eye on the chicks while they’re free-ranging, because there are a lot of foxes about just now. We can see them from the kitchen window, but Seb is quite happy in the hammock with a blanket and a book, and John has been sanding this chair on the patio. Spotted for sale in a front garden, I brought it home in early July and put it in the garage. It sat there, untouched, until I lost the ability to see past the dark varnish and faded seat and began to regret the purchase. It was on its way to the St Leonard’s Hospice shop to earn its second lot for charity in two months when I found John halfway through the project. I’m so glad he didn’t ask, and just got started, because I’ve fallen for it all over again. A new seat cover will take no time at all, so once he’s finished with the mouldings and fed the wood with beeswax, we’ll have a new chair for our bedroom.

I am under no illusions that either of us will actually sit on it. No, it’ll be where I lay my clothes out for the following morning. Old habits die hard, it seems, and it is so much easier to ease yourself out from under the covers if no thought is required. Besides, a pile of clothes you made yourself is always a little thrill. This morning’s selection was particularly pretty, in my eyes. Soon it’ll be too cold for my chambray peg trousers, so I’ve a pair planned in chocolate tweed as a second sample and winter alternative. The only question is which floral to use for the inner waistband and pockets.

First, though, I have another Snow Day jumper to knit. I let Fliss choose the wool, as it will be for her. This grey-pink is a little too lilac for my taste, but she loves it and I love knitting for her, so all is well. If you need me, I’ll be in my studio, knitting and taking tutorial photographs. Probably with a tea tray and a drama on the radio. Now that is a pleasure, and not a small one. I am looking forward to those hours.

Yet what might not come across in this post of crafting highlights is the hustle and bustle of our surrounding life. I got up at some ridiculous hour yesterday to take John to the station to catch a flight to Sweden, before a full day of work then home to children (who I love) and homework and dinner and packed lunches and laundry and ironing and washing up (which I don’t) and trying very hard to stay awake until it was time to collect them from Scouts (which I managed, only just). In between all of those things, nestled a row here and a row there of my Lionberry shawl, begun at the weekend and continued, all too briefly, in bed after my morning-taxi-driver run. I’ll be putting it aside now, until the sample jumper is gauge-swatched, knitted and blocked. But it’s there, coiled in the base of my basket, waiting for a moment when I need just five minutes of the small pleasure of wrapping wool around a needle and watching what emerges.

Madeleine

What’s bringing you pleasure at the moment?

If you can knit and purl, cast on and cast off, you can make this

The first thing I ever knitted was a jumper. A grey jumper, with a v-neck, in some sort of wool-acrylic mix. I was twenty and staying with my parents for a few months. My mum, casting around for something to fill my evenings, took me to the local wool shop and bought me the pattern and the wool, and sat me down, and taught me to knit all over again.

I say all over again because like most people, I had knit a bit as a child. A wobbly teddy bear scarf, if I remember rightly. But it hadn’t stuck, and I certainly couldn’t remember how to do it.

A few years later, I wandered into a little wool shop in York. I was expecting our second child and wanted to knit a big cardigan to wear throughout the pregnancy. On the racks were some magazines and a couple of Debbie Bliss books and I flicked through the pages until I found a beautiful drapey affair in duck egg blue. The shop assistant helped me to choose an appropriate yarn and some needles, and I went home and stowed my new book on my bookcase and the yarn in a drawer.

And there it stayed. Because I couldn’t make head nor tail of the pattern. Clearly my mum had done all the tricky bits for me, the one and only time I’d knitted as an adult. In fact, I couldn’t even remember how to cast on, or, erm, knit. And this was in the days before youtube, or even the internet, in our house.

In the end, a friend showed me how to cast on and knit, how to purl, and eventually, at the end of a very long hat, how to cast off. I made a couple of hats, for babies, with pompoms on their ends, but they weren’t what I wanted to make. I wanted to make a cardigan.

Eventually, after borrowing just about every craft book in the library and a lot of sheer bloody-mindedness, I made one. Then another. And then I started to design my own.

I’ve found it really interesting, speaking to people about this particular sweater pattern. I carry my knitting around with me, and post photos of it on the internet, and so lots of people have made comments along the lines of Gosh, that’s really lovely. So I tell them that it’s a pattern designed specially for new knitters. Would they like a go?

Oh, no, they tell me. I can’t read a pattern.

The thing is, you don’t need to be able to read a pattern to make this jumper. It – like all my beginner patterns – will help you to learn to read a pattern. It will help you to go off and make all the standard, commercial, codified patterns you’ve ever dreamed off. But you don’t need to be able to do that yet.

If you can knit and purl, cast on and cast off, you can make this. Heck, if you can knit and purl and know someone who can cast on and off, you can make this. The entire pattern is written out in duplicate: under each section of knitting-pattern-code is a much longer section explaining exactly what to do in plain EnglishWith extra instructions for the bits you might find confusing, or tricky, or just odd. In other words, this is a pattern where I’ve written in all the things I’d say to my just-begun-knitting-friend Mrs. Piper if we were knitting it in the pub together (which we must do again soon, Mrs. Piper). On top of that, there’ll be a friendly week-by-week knit along taking you through everything with pictures – and I’ll leave it up permanently so that you needn’t feel rushed. Of course, it goes without saying that I’ll answer any questions you might have.

 

In my real life, beyond this blog, I’m a teacher. I’ve spent literally years learning how to teach people as effectively as possible. So when I decided to start selling patterns, it was quite natural for me to want to make the first collection for beginners. This jumper is my knitting primer, if you will. You start at the bottom of the back: just a bit of knit-every-row garter stitch to warm up. Then there’s straightforward stockinette all the way up the back, to really get your hand in. Once you’re happy with that, you can choose whether you want an extra (little) challenge on the front, in the form of bobbles, or whether you’d like to keep it plain and simple. We don’t cast off around the neckline, so knitting the edging on is a simple case of a few more rounds of knitting every row. The sleeves are knit two, purl two rib: the next step in any knitter’s journey, with some simple increases to keep them looking good. Then you just sew it all together and weave in the ends in front of a good film.

At the same time, though, for all its simplicity I wanted this jumper to be something I wanted to wear. What’s the good in making your own wardrobe if that’s where it’s going to stay, ill-fitting and lumpen and sad? So I added some flattering little details – notched side seams, an inch of extra length at the back, optional extra-long sleeves with thumb-holes for cold hands, a tiny bit of shaping around the front neckline so that the boatneck collar lies beautifully over your collarbone. The sleeves drop elegantly away from your shoulders, keeping it casual, but the body isn’t so big and baggy that it doesn’t show off your curves. Once I’d sewn in the last end, on Tuesday night, I slipped it on to find that it was all I’d hoped for: comfy and warm and cosy and attractive. I will be living in this, this winter.

I do so hope you’ll join me in making one of these over the course of the next few weeks. Knitting a jumper is such an autumnal thing to do: a way to make the darkening days appealing, somehow, like cinnamon and candles and long walks through reddening woods. The pattern is, of course, to be entirely free for the duration of the knit along, and is yours to keep thereafter. If you are a new – or even an aspiring – knitter, make this the autumn of your first jumper, and one day you’ll be telling your own story to the people you teach how to knit.

Madeleine

If you’re already a knitter, do you have a story about when you first learned to knit?

New knitters (and old!) feel free to ask any questions in the comments below!

If you’ve not already subscribed, you might want to, just so you don’t miss the pattern when it comes out.

This way for free patterns

Last week the children went back to school, so I picked a bunch of the prettiest double-click cosmos to take to work with me in my little studio upstairs. It’s a tiny room, just big enough for a desk, a chair, and my spinning wheel tucked into a gap at the end. Nestled between two bedrooms at the front of the house, it’s the space above the porch, and I can look out of the tall sash window at passers-by while the sun streams in and fills the room with warmth. In fact, it’s the cosiest room in the house, which is perfect for wintry days when I’m the only one at home. With the door shut, a cup of tea and perhaps a hot water bottle on my lap, I can settle in for hours. Or that’s the hope. It’s only been mine since the spring.

Normally, at this time of year, I do a little stocktake of my wardrobe and plan the things I’d like to fill the gaps with. Not one to enjoy excess, I keep a smallish wardrobe of under 40 items, including tights and wellies and suchlike. I know that limiting options is not to everyone’s taste, but I enjoy the challenge of creating a versatile collection. All of my clothes can be dressed up and down and mixed and matched, and so three dresses and tops and bottoms and jumpers and shoes result in a surprising variety of looks. And if you happen to feel that the sartorial more is the merrier, my clothes give you all the more options to play with.

Inevitably, I find that I need to replace one thing from each category: a new dress, a new top, and new bottom of some sort, and a new jumper (sweater). That’s the way I’ve structured the patterns for this year: one of each, with a few essential accessories like knickers and Fairisle wrist warmers. The plan is to release one a month, to match what I like to make as the autumn shifts towards winter and, blissfully, spring. I know I’m not alone in considering the autumn to be knitting weather, so the first pattern will be my new jumper.

I’ve explained before that the patterns are aimed at new or newish makers, and the knitting patterns are no exception. One of the hardest things about learning to knit is learning to read a pattern. We can all make the stitches long before we can decipher that secret code. So my knitting patterns have the standard pattern written in bold, then a detailed set of jargon-free instructions and photographs beneath. They are clear enough for anyone who can cast on, knit and purl to follow.

As it’ll be the first pattern to be released, it’ll be available completely free through this blog for a limited period of time. So if you fancy making a comfy, boxy knitted jumper with (or without) popcorn bobbles on the front and super-warm ribbed sleeves (I’m thinking that it’ll go perfectly with a cosy body-warmer when out and about), stick around. There will be photos of the finished jumper and more details about it next week. It’s probably a good idea to sign up for email notifications so that you don’t miss either that post or the pattern when it comes out, as it won’t be free forever. (You’ll find the sign-up under ‘Join our community’, in the sidebar.)

If, on the other hand, knitting is not your thing, don’t despair. There’s a rather lovely but very simple lined A-line skirt coming out in October – perfect to pair with your new jumper or any others in your collection. This, too, will be a free first pattern for a limited time, so that you can see just how I’ve constructed and written it to make it completely accessible to anyone who can work a machine (or is willing to sew all those seams by hand). Again, sign up for email notifications so that you don’t miss out.

There are lots of other plans in the offing: other pattern giveaways, FAQ pages, tutorials, a photo gallery of your finished projects and link up parties to your posts about the patterns. There will be a toe-up stripy sock pattern – aimed squarely at beginners – as well as a gorgeously flattering pencil dress, an embroidered tee, the blousiest summer blouse… All of which makes me think that I really ought to be getting back to it. I’ll be upstairs in my studio, if anyone needs me. (Those words still send a little thrill down my spine.) It’s going to be such an exciting year, I just can’t wait for it all to begin.

Madeleine

PS – Are you a knitter or a sewer or both? Or are you just starting out in your me-made wardrobe journey? What’s in the pipeline for you, this season?