A-line skirt sewalong part three: the zip and side seam

Welcome back to the third week of the A-line skirt sewalong! This week, we’re going to insert the zip and finish the second side seam. Invisible zips are the easiest to insert because any little wobbles are, well, invisible. Lay out your skirt right side out, so that the unattached edges B and D are on centred and on the top. The back of the skirt (piece 2) will be on the left and the front (piece 1) on the right. You can see this in the photo below.

Now lay your zip, with the invisible side (teeth hidden) facing down, at the top of edge D. Line up the top of the actual zip (not the extra tape at the top) with the top of the waistband. Line up the teeth of the zip with the sewing line of D. Pin into place. Remember to fold down and pin the protruding top end of the zip, too. In the photo below, I have pinned the zip into place but haven’t folded the top of the zip down yet.

Now, this next bit is crucial. It takes a bit of time but saves a lot more time with a seam ripper later on. Hand sew the zip into place. Use medium sized stitches. Doing this means that you’ll sew it in neatly and accurately when you get to the machine. Then remove the pins. Unzip the zip all the way, taking care not to inadvertently pull the zip-pull right off the end, or your zip will be useless.

Fix your zipper foot to the machine. The key to inserting an invisible zip invisibly is to sew as close as possible to the teeth, by actually rolling them out of the way as you sew. In the photo below, I’m pulling the teeth out of the way. The point of the pin shows you how close I’ll get to the teeth. You can achieve a really neat job if you go slowly and carefully. Your basting stitches will stop everything shifting about, so you can focus on getting as close to those teeth as possible. Stitch the zip into place from the top to the bottom. The zip pull will stop you from being able to get all the way to the bottom; just do your best. Remember to backstitch at either end.

Now you’re going to sew the other side of the zipper to the front of the skirt. Press the seam allowance of edge B towards the wrong side, so that you have a crease where the sewing line is. Lay the skirt wrong side out this time, but still with edges B and D on top. Piece 1 (the front) will be on the left and piece 2 (the back) on the right.

Zip up the zip. Mark the point where you stopped sewing on the other side of the zip, with a fabric marker or pen. (This will be the point where you couldn’t get any closer to the bottom of the zip, because the zip-pull was in the way.)

Arrange the zip so that the unsewn side of it is invisible side (teeth hidden) down on the seam allowance of B. Making sure that the tops of both ends of the waistbands line up nicely, pin it to the top of the waistband. Don’t worry about folding the top of the zip over at this stage.

Then unzip the zip again. Aligning the teeth to the sewing edge of B, pin it into place from top to bottom. Make sure that you only pin the zip to the seam allowance, and not the outside of the skirt.

Check that you’ve positioned the zip correctly by arranging the skirt pieces as if they were all sewn up. The zip should be enclosed within the skirt, with the pull on the outside. If it’s incorrect, now’s the time to change it. If it’s correct, fold down the top of the zip, and hand sew the zip into place. Remove all the pins as you go. Zip it up and down again, just to check that everything is nicely aligned.

Using the machine, sew it into place, just as you did for the other side of the zip. Take your time and get as close to the teeth as you can. Stop when you reach the mark you made.

Now zip up the zip and turn your skirt inside out. Pushing the unsewn bottom part of the zip up and out of the way, insert a pin to hold the seam BD together along the sewing line. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below. The pin needs to go as close as possible to the bottom of the stitched down portion of the zip.

Pin the rest of seam BD along the sewing line. Sew this seam, from as close you can get from the bottom of the zip all the way to edge E, making the join as smooth as possible. It should look like this from the right side:

Then turn it inside out and press the seam open. By now, it should be looking nice and neat.

That’s it! The zip and second side seam are done! Next time, you’ll finish the hem of your skirt.

Madeleine

Have you inserted an invisible zip before? What about other types of zip? Or have you been wary of them in the past?

 

Little Flurries knitalong part three: the front

Welcome back to the third part of the Little Flurries knitalong. By now, you should have completed the back of the sweater. If not, just carry on with it – this tutorial will be waiting for you whenever you’re ready to get started on the front.

Just so you’re aware, I’ve used the same text and photographs for the first part of this tutorial as in the Snow Day ‘front’ tutorial. This is because the bottom of the front and the bobbles are exactly the same on both sweaters. However, unlike the Snow Day jumper, Little Flurries has a few options for the front.

Option A

If you’ve chosen option A, you just need to refer to last week’s ‘back’ tutorial to see how to create your notched hem. Bear in mind that the notches are shorter on the front than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to knit. Then work in stocking stitch (knit all the right side rows, purl all the wrong side rows) until you reach the desired length. Once you’ve done that, scroll down towards the bottom of this tutorial for instructions on how to work the envelope style neck.

Options B, C and D

For options B, C and D, you also need to know how to make bobbles. Before you do that, however, you need to create your notched hem. It’s shorter than the one for the back, but made in exactly the same way. So head on over to the tutorial for the back, and work your notched hem. Please bear in mind that the front hem is shorter than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to work for the front.

Once you’ve finished the notched section, it’s time to start on the bobbles. Regardless of what colour your bobbles will be made in, they are all made the same way. Read the following instructions, then see the instructions on creating two tone bobbles (option C) and yellow bobbles (option D), below.

You begin by knitting however many stitches the pattern specifies for your size, in order to reach the point where you will make your first bobble. So take a moment to knit to that place, and then have a quick read of all the bobble instructions before making your first bobble.

You’re going to make a bobble out of the next stitch. In the photo below, the metal needle is pointing at the stitch that you are going to make the bobble out of.

Knit the stitch, but don’t slide it off the left needle. In the photo below, the newly knitted stitch is on the right hand needle, but the original stitch is still on the left hand needle (being held on by my index finger). You’ve just made two stitches out of one original stitch.

Put your yarn to the front of your work, so that you are ready to purl.

Now purl into the same stitch (the one that my index finger is touching in the photo above). You can see my inserted needle, ready to purl that stitch, in the photo below.

Again, don’t slide this stitch off your needle. You can now see, as in the photo below, that you have two new stitches (one knit and one purl) on your right hand needle, and still that same original stitch on your left needle (my index finger is holding it in the photo below).

Move your yarn to the back of your work again, as in the photo below.

and knit into this same stitch again, as you can see me doing below.

This time, you are finally allowed to slide that stitch off your left hand needle once you’ve knitted it. So you can see, below, that my thumb is indicating the three new stitches that we’ve made out of that single initial stitch. There’s a purl stitch in the centre, and a knit stitch on either side of it.

Okay? So you’ve turned one stitch into three. This provides the breadth of the bobble. Now we need to give it some height. To do this, we’re going to work just these three new stitches for a couple of rows of stocking stitch, as follows:

Turn your work so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front, so that you are set up like the photo below.

Purl these three stitches.

Turn your work again so that the right side is facing you, and move your yarn to the back, as you can see below.

Knit these three stitches.

Turn the work again so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front once more, as shown in the photo below.

Purl the same three stitches again.

Finally, turn your work so that the right side is facing, and move your yarn to the back again, as shown below.

This is the special bit. You’re going to knit all three of these same stitches together into one stitch. To do this, you literally knit the three stitches as if they were one. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below. In fact, treating all three stitches as one even makes them look as if I’m only knitting one stitch. I’m not; my needle is inserted through all three stitches knitwise (i.e. as if knitting normally) at the same time.

Wrap your working yarn to make a knit stitch as normal, move the right needle under the left as usual and slide all three stitches off the left hand needle as if you were just knitting one stitch.

That’s it! You’ve made a bobble! It’ll look more like a proper bobble once you’ve worked a couple more rows. For now, just knit a few more stitches, keeping count so that you know when to make the next bobble. In the photo below you can see that I’ve knit my bobble stitch, with all that bulk below and to the right of it, and then three more normal knit stitches.

I assure you that it’ll look much more like a proper bobble in a couple of rows’ time, at which point you’ll be able to give it a prod and a poke from behind to make it more rounded and full. For now though, just concentrate on getting to the end of the row. Remember, count your stitches and stop when it’s time to make the next bobble.

By the time you get to the end of your row, it’ll look something like this:

My empty needle is pointing at one of the bobbles.

Carry on in stocking stitch (knit the right side rows, purl the wrong side rows) for the specified number of rows, then work the next bobble row in exactly the same way. You’ll notice that on the next bobble row there are fewer bobbles and more knit stitches in between them.

Option C only

For option C, you make your bobbles in the same colour as the sleeves. In my sample, the bobbles and sleeves are in a dark teal and the body is in an aquamarine colour.

Knit the number of stitches specified before making the first bobble. You are going to make the bobble on the stitch that the empty needle is pointing to, below.

Insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if to knit. Pick up your bobble yarn, and lay it over your right needle, with the ball to your right and the tail to your left. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Using this yarn, work the bobble as explained in the instructions above. You’ll find that you need to pull the tail tight from time to time, but don’t worry if it’s a bit loose. You can make it tight when you weave all your ends in later.

Once you’ve worked the bobble, pick up your body yarn and knit the next stitch. Pull the yarn tight across the back of the bobble as you work this stitch. Then knit either 3 stitches (if there are 7 stitches between your bobbles) or 4 stitches (if there are 8 stitches between your bobbles). Now you want to carry your bobble yarn across the back of your work, so that you don’t have great dangly loops on the inside of the jumper.

Insert your right needle as if to knit, as shown below.

With your left hand, gently bring the bobble yarn across the right needle from right to left, as shown. Your tension is important here. Don’t pull it so tight that your jumper looses its stretch, and don’t leave it so loose that you’ll have a big loop at the back of your work. You’ll know when it feels about right.

Then wrap your body yarn as if to knit that stitch as normal (i.e. from left to right):

before moving your bobble yarn to the right of the needle and downwards, effectively taking it off the needle. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Then finish knitting the stitch as normal. You can see my knitted stitch below. It’s the one furthest to the left on the right hand needle. It should look like a perfectly normal knit stitch in the body yarn.

What this does is twist the bobble yarn into the body yarn at the back of your work, meaning that the bobble yarn is only carried for 3 or 4 stitches before being attached to the jumper again. This way, the loops are kept small and neat, and won’t catch on the child when they are putting the jumper on or taking it off.

Your work should look like mine, below, on the wrong side. Can you see where the bobble yarn has been used to make a bobble (just above my fingernail), and then again when it’s been carried by a normal stitch (at the right end of the work)?

Carry on in this manner until you’ve knit the final bobble of the row. You will probably find that your bobbles are all sitting on the wrong side of your work. This isn’t a problem at all. Once you’ve knit a couple more rows of stocking stitch, you’ll be able to push them through to the right side. Mine all came out on the wrong side:

but I pushed them through later.

Now you have a choice. You can either cut your bobble yarn with a nice long tail and resign yourself to weaving in lots of ends. If you’re new to carrying your yarns, that’s what I’d advise, in case you get your tension wrong on the next row. It’s only a little jumper, so there won’t be too many ends to weave in.

However, if you loathe dealing with ends (I don’t, really), you can continue to carry your bobble yarn all the way to the end of the row, making sure that you attach it to the final stitch, as I’ve done here:

Then, when you turn your work, you need to carry the yarn every few stitches but in reverse, as you will be purling your work. Then, as you work the next 8 rows of stocking stitch, be sure to twist the bobble yarn around the body yarn as you start each knit row, so that the yarn is carried up the side of the jumper. Then the bobble yarn will be in the right place when you go to knit the next bobble row. It’s up to you.

Option D only

Joining the yellow yarn to work the bobbles in a contrast colour is really easy.

Knit the specified number of stitches, working any green bobbles as specified. When you get to the place for a yellow bobble, insert your needle into that stitch as if about to knit it, as below:

and then lay your yellow yarn across your right needle with the tail on the left and the ball of yarn on the right, like so:

Take hold of your yarn and knit that first stitch, remembering not to slide the worked stitch off the needle, as you’re about to purl into that same stitch. Can you see how there’s now a yellow stitch in the photo below?

Keep on working the bobble, as normal. Don’t worry if it looks a bit loose. Mine does, in the photo below, but that’s normal. Feel free to give the tail a pull to tighten things up, and just keep working that bobble.

Once the bobble is done, snip the yellow yarn, leaving a nice long tail of 3-4 inches. You can see in the photo below that my bobble is hiding at the back of my work – again, that’s not a problem.

Knit the next stitch, as normal, and carry on as instructed by the pattern until you reach the end of your row.

My bobble ended up on the wrong side of my work, this time. Can you see it against all those purled stitches on the wrong side, below?

You would barely know it was there, from the front. All you can see in the photo below is a stitch on the needle and what looks like a purl stitch underneath it.

Poke it through from the back, just using your finger,

give those loose ends a gentle tug from the back,

and you’ll have a nice, neat, yellow bobble sitting on the right side of your work.

Don’t worry about the loose ends yet. You’ll weave them in when you make up the sweater.

All options

Carry on knitting the front of your jumper until you reach the length specified for your chosen size, or your desired length (but only if you bought extra wool to allow for extra length). For options B, C and D, don’t worry which row of the bobble-making pattern you finish on; it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that you make a wrong side (even numbered) row the last one you work.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening. This is done in exactly the same way on the front as it was on the back. Head on over to the back tutorial, and follow the instructions from where it says Working the neckline.

There you go! You’ve finished the front and back of your Little Flurries jumper! Just the sleeves to knit now – see you for that tutorial next Friday.

Madeleine

Do you like the way the bobbles look in your chosen colour(s)? Any winning combinations out there? Do make colour suggestions in the comments below!

A-line skirt sewalong part two: the darts and the waistband

Hello there! Welcome back to week two of the A-line skirt sewalong. In today’s tutorial you’re going to learn how to insert darts, interface the waistband, and attach the waistband to the skirt.

The first thing you need to do is zigzag around all those edges, apart from edge E. Just set your machine to a wide zigzag stitch and whizz your way around all of your pieces. This stops the fabric unravelling. You can see that I’ve done that in the photo below.

Set your machine back to a straight stitch. Now it’s time to insert those darts into piece 2. Working on just one dart at a time, fold the fabric right sides together so that the two diagonal lines of the dart lie on top of one another. The excess fabric should be on the wrong side of the fabric, as shown below.

The trick with darts is to iron them flat, pin them along the sewing line, and sew from the fat end towards the point. Never sew all the way to the point: stop a few stitches early, leave your ends long and tie them in a granny knot. This prevents the end from puckering. You can see one of my finished darts in this photo:

Press the darts towards the centre back of the skirt:

Now you’re going to prepare the waistband. Lay your waistband (piece 3), wrong side up, along your ironing board.

Centre your interfacing, glue side down, on your waistband. The glue side is normally a bit bumpy to the touch. You should have the seam allowance of the waistband showing evenly all the way around the interfacing. You can see this in the photograph below. Following the manufacturer’s instructions, iron the interfacing onto the waistband. It’s advisable to place an old cloth between your iron and the interfacing, to protect your iron.

Now fold your waistband (piece 3) in half lengthways and wrong sides together so that seams F and G are touching. Your waistband will be the right way out. Press along the fold to create a crease. I’ve just pressed mine in the photograph below.

Sew seam BD down the left hand side only of the skirt. With right sides together, pin seam BD of the skirt fabric from top to bottom. If piece 2 is on top of piece 1, you are pinning the seam on the right.

I forgot to take a photo of this stage (sorry!), but here’s a photo of the finished seam, so you can see which side seam you are sewing. It’s the sewn, pressed and therefore slightly sticking up seam on the right. Remember, piece 2 is on top.

With right sides together, sew seam BD of the skirt fabric from top to bottom. Press seam BD open. You can see how I’ve draped the skirt over my ironing board to do this, here:

You are now going to sew the waistband to the skirt. Open out your skirt, so that it is lying right side up.

Open up your waistband. Now line up edge G of the waistband with edge C of the skirt, so that the raw edges of each are together and the stitching line of H is in line with the stitching line of D (not seam BD). The right side of the waistband should lie against the right side of the skirt. Pin seam GC. It should look just like this:

Then continue round the top of the skirt, pinning piece 3 to piece 1 along seam GA. Because the waistband is straight and the skirt is curved, you have to pull gently on the curved skirt to fit the waistband to it, like so:

Once it is pinned into place all the way along, sew all the way along the seam GC and GA. (Make sure you keep edge F out of the way.)

Now unfold the waistband, smoothing it upwards, and press seam GA and GC open on the wrong side. You want all the seam allowances to be pressed upwards towards the top of the waistband too. Then you need to fold the seam allowance on edge F down, over the interfacing, and iron it down. You can see that I’ve done all of this here:

Next, you need to fold the whole waistband in half lengthways, wrong sides together, so that F is folded down to G. It should look like a finished (but unsewn) waistband, like so:

Pin this into place.

I always like to finish my clothing by hand, as it gives such a neat finish. Sew the folded edge of F to the inside of the skirt, taking care that your stitches can’t be seen on the right side. It’s easiest to insert your needle a couple of millimetres above the folded edge of the waistband, and sew through the seam allowances hidden inside. Then bring your needle out on the folded edge of the waistband, a bit further along. Here is my needle in the middle of taking a complete stitch.

Then insert your needle a couple of millimetres above where you have just brought it out. You’ll leave a little trail of tiny stitches on the inside, and nothing at all on the outside. It should look like this on the inside:

When you fold the back of the waistband over, it should look like this from the back of the skirt

and like this from the front:

It’s beginning to look like a skirt! Next week, you’ll be inserting the zipper and finishing the other side seam.

Madeleine

How are you getting on? It’s always great to get feedback, be it questions, comments or suggestions – do let me know if these tutorials are helpful to you.

Little Flurries knitalong part two: the back

Welcome to the second part of the Little Flurries knitalong. This week, you’re going to be working the back of the sweater. As the bottom hem of the back is identical to that of the Snow Day sweater, I’ve used the text and photos from that tutorial for the first part of this one. However, you’ll notice that the colour of the yarn changes partway through this tutorial. That’s because the neckline of Little Flurries is completely different to the neckline of Snow Day – so that part of the tutorial is brand new.

Let’s begin at the bottom hem. You’ve had a bit of practice casting on and knitting while you were making your swatch, so this should be a breeze. In fact, if you get the first 26 rows done over the weekend, you’ll have lots of lovely mindless stocking stitch to relax with in the evenings throughout the coming week.

The first thing you need to do is cast all the stitches onto your larger needle (the one you swatched for). This just makes knitting that first row much easier, as the stitches will be a bit looser than if you cast them onto your smaller needle. However, the smaller needle is used to knit the rest of the hem. So you literally hold the larger needle (with all the cast on stitches on it) in one hand, and the smaller needle in your other hand. I’m right handed and knit in the UK way, so in the photo below the cast on stitches are on the larger needle (on the left), and I’ve just started to knit them all across onto my smaller needle (on the right).

Done? Right, now before you forget, put that larger needle away and pick up the other smaller needle. You should now be working exclusively with your pair of smaller needles. The pattern tells you to knit some rows of garter stitch. Just to remind you, that means that you knit every row. Don’t purl anything.

Once you’ve knitted the required number of rows of garter stitch, you’re ready to work on the notches. In this next section, you’re going to be knitting stocking stitch in the centre of the work, and garter stitch at either end. It’s actually really easy.

You also need to start using your larger needles again. So pick up one of your large needles and use it to work all the stitches of the following row.

We start on the right side, and just knit the whole row. Put the smaller needle (that you’ve just emptied of stitches) to one side, and pick up your other larger needle. You’re going to be working with your pair of larger needles for the rest of the back. Turn your work.

Then, on the wrong side, you need to knit the first five stitches only. In the photo below, that’s precisely where I’m up to. Can you see how the first five stitches are still in garter stitch? That’s because we’re still knitting both sides of those first five stitches.

However, we want the central section to be stocking stitch, so you need to purl all the way across the row until you are five stitches before the end. Don’t forget to bring your yarn to the front of your work before you start purling, like so:

When you get to those last five stitches, stop. Move your yarn to the back of your work again, ready to knit. Then knit those last five stitches, to create the garter stitch notch on the other side of the back.

Take a look at your work, without turning it. From the wrong side, which you’ve just finished working, it will look like the photo below. Those are the first five knit stitches (on the right), and then the purl stitches stretching off to the left. There will be five more purl stitches on the far left edge of your knitting.

Turn your work, and knit the whole row. By the time you finish this row, your work should look like the photo below, on the right side (the side you’ve just finished working).

Can you see the garter notch beginning to emerge on the right hand side? Work a few more rows (in the same way as the previous two) and it’ll be much clearer:

Carry on in this manner until you’ve worked as many rows as the pattern tells you to. Then stop and have a celebratory drink/ dance/ pat on the back. That’s the hardest part of the back done.

Now all you need to do is work the rest of the back in stocking stitch until it reaches the required length (see the pattern to find out what this is in your chosen size). That means that you knit all the stitches on the right side and purl all the stitches on the wrong side. Easy.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening.

Working the neckline

The first thing that you need to do is knit the garter stitch section at the front of the neckline, while keeping the shoulder sections in stocking stitch. This is much easier than casting off and picking up stitches to work a separate collar.

All you have to do on the first row is knit the whole thing. On the next row, which is a wrong side row, you need to purl the first 17 stitches. This ensures that this bit of the work will remain in stocking stitch. You can see that I’ve done this in the picture below.

Your yarn will be at the front because you’ve been purling. Move it to the back, ready to knit, like so:

and knit all the way to the last 17 stitches. In the photo below you can see the difference between the first, purled, stitches, and the knitted ones. My pencil is pointing at the first knitted stitch.

Bring your yarn to the front again:

and purl the last 17 stitches. Turn your work. It should look like the picture below, with the stitches at either end still in stocking stitch, and the garter stitch edging beginning to emerge in the middle. My pencil is pointing to the place where the change occurs.

Work the next 4 rows in the same way, knitting the right side rows and doing a combination of knit and purl stitches on the wrong side rows, as directed by the pattern. Please note that the number of stitches you purl changes each time.

Now you’re ready to cast off those centre stitches. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern. You can see that I’ve done this, below.

Then knit two more stitches. My metal needle is pointing at the stitch that we are going to bind off first (below). Can you see why you needed to knit two more stitches? If you hadn’t, you would have bound off too early.

Bind off that stitch as normal, by carrying it over the end of your right needle. In the picture below, my metal needle is pointing to the bound off stitch.

Continue to knit one stitch and then bind off the previous stitch until you’ve bound off the required number of stitches. Remember, when binding off you count each stitch as you actually bind it off, not as you knit it. When you’ve done the correct number, you should have one stitch remaining on your right needle (plus the shoulder stitches at the far end) and the number of stitches you are supposed to knit, minus one, on your left needle. You can see this in my photograph below.

Knit the rest of those stitches, and you’ll have the correct number of knit stitches on either side of the bound off section. Your work should look like the photo below. Can you see the two shoulder sections, with the bound off neckline in the middle? (Ignore the bobbles: the front neckline is worked in exactly the same way as the back, so I took these photos while working the front – hence the bobbles.)

The next thing to do is to decrease those shoulder stitches so that they can be sewn together later to form a toddler-friendly envelope neckline.

You are going to work the right shoulder (what would be the right shoulder if someone was wearing it) first. The stitches for the left shoulder will still be on your needle, but just ignore them for now.

The right shoulder actually uses slightly more complicated decreases than the left. They aren’t difficult at all, but it might take you a while to remember them as they have a few steps. However, they are important because they make the collar curve away in the correct direction as the stitches are decreased.

You start with a wrong side row. Purl the number of stitches specified by the pattern. Then stop. This is all I’ve done, below.

Now you need to make your slip, slip, purl (ssp) decrease. In order to make the decreases point in the right direction, you need to twist them by slipping them onto your right needle as if you were going to knit them. So you insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if you were going to knit it, as shown here:

and just slip it off your left needle. Do this again, and you should have two slipped (but not worked) stitches with all those purled stitches on your right needle. You can see them in the photograph below.

Next, you need to get those two stitches back onto your left needle, so that you can work them. But you don’t want to twist them back to how they were in the first place. So you need to insert your left needle into both stitches, from left to right, and slip them straight back onto the left needle. You can see how I’ve inserted my left needle to do this, below. Don’t work those stitches at all, yet.

You can see in the picture below that they are back on my left needle, in their new orientation, and not worked.

Now it’s finally time to work those two stitches. You need to insert your right needle into them ‘through the back loop’. This means that you insert your needle as if to purl, but you pick up both stitches at the same time, and you insert your needle from the left hand side at the back. It might all feel a bit tight and awkward, but persevere. You can see my right needle inserted in the picture below.

Then you just purl that stitch as normal. In the next picture, you can see that the last stitch is just a purl stitch, except that it has purled two stitches into one. That’s the slip, slip, purl stitch (ssp) done.

Move your yarn to the back of your work (as shown below) and knit the rest of the stitches. All of your wrong side rows will be worked in this manner, although the number of stitches to knit and purl varies. Just follow the pattern.

When you get to the end of the row, turn your work. Now you’re going to work the first right side row.

Knit four stitches. Now it’s time to work the slip, slip, knit stitch.

Slip the next stitch onto your right needle as if you were going to knit it – but don’t work it at all. You can see my needle, inserted as if to knit, below. We are slipping stitches knitwise again in order to twist them around – just as we did for the slip, slip, purl stitch.

Do the same for the next stitch. You can see two slipped stitches on my right needle, below.

Now you are going to knit those two stitches together, but ‘through the back loop’. You do this by inserting your left needle into both stitches at the same time, from right to left. I find it easiest to hold my needles almost parallel:

Once your left needle is inserted, move it so that your needles are perpendicular again, and knit those two stitches together as if you were knitting a normal stitch. You can see my needles in position, ready to do this, below.

Then knit the rest of the stitches in the row.

Carry on working all the wrong side rows with the ssp stitch, and the right side rows with the ssk stitch, until you only have one stitch left. Don’t be put off when you have to work an ssp at the start of a new row, or a ssk at the end of a row. Just carry on working the stitches as explained, above. Your work will decrease by one stitch in every row.

Then snip your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch, to secure it. Your right shoulder is done! It should have a nice curve, and the decrease stitches should all point outwards, as below:

Now it’s time to work the left shoulder. You start working this on the wrong side, and you need to rejoin your yarn. The first stitch is a knit stitch (even though you are working into a purl stitch), so insert your needle as if to knit, and lay your yarn across your right needle with the loose end to the left (see below). Knit the first four stitches.

Now you are going to work the ‘purl two together’ (p2tog) stitch. Bring your yarn to the front, ready to purl.

Insert your needle as you normally would to purl, but instead of just inserting it through one stitch, you need to insert it through two stitches at the same time:

Then purl those two stitches, just as if you were purling one normal stitch. That’s the end of the p2tog stitch. Now you just purl to the end of the row.

Turn your work, ready to work a right side row. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern, then stop.

Now it’s time to work the ‘knit two together’ (k2tog) stitch. Insert your right needle into the next two stitches at the same time, from left to right, just as if you were knitting one normal knit stitch.

Then knit the two stitches, exactly as if they were just one normal knit stitch. That’s the k2tog stitch done.

Now knit to the end of the row.

Continue working the wrong side and right side rows just like this, remembering to follow the number of knit and purl stitches for every row, because it changes. Don’t be put off when you have to purl two together at the end of a row, or knit two together at the start of a row. You just do it exactly as you’ve done it before.

Keep going until you only have one stitch left, then cut your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch to secure it.

The left shoulder should look like mine, below, with a tail from the joined-in yarn, and the decreases pointing off to the right.

That’s the back done! Come back next week for the knitalong tutorial for the front – time to start working those bobbles…

Madeleine

Who are you knitting your Little Flurries for? Have you gone for a Christmas tree version, or one of the other options?

 

 

 

A-line skirt sewalong part one: gathering and cutting

Hello, and welcome to the first part of the A-line skirt sewalong. If you’re new to garment making and would like step-by-step support in making this simple skirt, you’ve come to the right place.

Please read all of the instructions both here and in the pattern booklet before cutting out your pieces.

This skirt looks lovely but different in all sorts of fabrics. The stiffer the fabric, the more it sticks out. I made a lovely structured version a couple of years ago in a boiled wool felt, which looked a bit Jetsons. This time, I’ve gone for a floppy but thick linen, which hangs beautifully. Choose your fabric according to what you want, but make sure that it’s sturdy enough to stand up to being sat on a lot, and firm enough that it won’t go baggy around the rear end too quickly.

Whatever you choose, wash it the way you’ll wash it after it’s made up, dry it, and iron it. Make sure that you have everything else that you need, too.

I’m going to assume that you’ve measured yourself and chosen a size, but if not, go and do that now.

The first thing that you need to do is print out one page of the pattern pieces. Then – and this is imperative – measure the little test box at the top of that the page. If it measures 5×5 cm, go ahead and print the rest of the pattern in the same way. If it doesn’t, check that your printer is set to print at 100% and try again. If the box is the wrong size, the pattern will be, too.

Next, cut out all of the pattern boxes and arrange them in a grid pattern. You’ll notice that each pattern box has two numbers in the top left corner. This indicates its place in the grid. The first number indicates the row, and the second indicates the column. The rows run from top to bottom and the columns from left to right. So box 1,1 is the top left hand box. Box 4,5 is on the fourth row from the top, fifth box from the left.

Then stick them all together. Try to be as accurate as you can, as this will affect the fit of your skirt. Obviously the odd millimetre doesn’t matter, but do your best.

Next, highlight the size that you are going to make. It is all too easy to cut out the wrong size, or sew the wrong dart.

Now you can cut out your pattern pieces. For this tutorial, I’ve laid out my pieces on a 45″ wide piece of fabric, as this is the simplest layout. Fold your fabric in half, along the grain (lengthways). Lie your pattern pieces out at shown below, with the fold of the fabric in line with the fold line on the pattern pieces. Remember to leave a seam allowance around all the other edges.

(If you want to use a 150cm/ 60″ wide piece of fabric, the layout is slightly more complex. Fold one side of your fabric in by 44cm/ 17″ and lay out one skirt piece as shown.

Then fold the other edge in by 44cm/ 17″ (they will overlap) and lay out the other pieces as shown. Make sure that you leave a seam allowance between the two skirt pieces. You need to place, cut, refold and place each pattern piece for this method, but it is more efficient than using a square 150cm/ 60″ piece of fabric.)

Pin or weigh down your pattern pieces so that they don’t move. Then, using either chalk or a fabric pen/pencil, draw around each piece (but not on the fold). This will be your sewing line.

Then draw another line (again, not on the fold) 1.5 cm or about half an inch outside of your sewing line. This will be your cutting line. You can make this seam allowance bigger or smaller as you choose. Personally, I like small seam allowances, but it can be handy to have a bigger one in case you want to let the skirt out later.

Along the bottom hem of the skirt, allow a bigger 6cm/ 2″seam allowance. This will allow for a nice deep hem, and for some flexibility when determining the final length of your skirt.

Go and have a cup of tea. When you get back, double check everything. Only then can you cut out your skirt and waistband pieces. You should also cut out your interfacing at this point.

Now you can unpin the paper piece from the back skirt, and transfer all the markings so that you know which seam is which later on. You also want to transfer the dart markings to the back pieces. I do this by poking a hole in the paper at several points in the dart, making dots on the fabric through the holes, and then joining the dots. Then unfold your fabric piece and flip your pattern piece over to transfer all the markings to the other half the back skirt piece. Remember that there’s a dart on the other half of the back, too.

Phew – that’s the hardest bit done. Next time, we’ll be putting in the darts and attaching the waistband.

 

The A-Line skirt pattern is now available!

It is with no small amount of excitement that I’m writing to let you know that my first ever dressmaking pattern is now for sale! You can find it in my Etsy shop. I cannot begin to tell you how much I’ve learned through this process – in fact, it could be the subject of another whole series. For now, allow me to share a couple more images with you.

We took the photos while we were on a family holiday in Derbyshire this half term. My parents booked the most beautiful house for all 14 of us, and this was the view from the kitchen windows:

So naturally it became the location for a little photoshoot. The stone steps with flowerbeds take you down from the back of the house to the lawn.

I had planned to give this skirt to Fliss, but having styled it for the photoshoot I think it’ll be filling a skirt-shaped hole in my wardrobe until I try out another pattern. It is as elegant and easy to wear as I remembered – perhaps even a little more so.

We had such a lovely time, pottering about and having a little outing every day. One day most of us went down a local mine. Another – rainbow-filled – day we spent in the grounds of Chatsworth:

And my personal highlight was our visit to Haddon Hall. I’d never been there before and I was blown away. I’ve been to a LOT of stately homes and never seen anything like this. No wonder they shoot so many period films there. I’m going to write a post all about it next week, but for now let me share just a glimpse here and there…

When we got home, I spent a couple of days finalising the pattern pdfs for the Little Flurries jumper and the A-Line skirt, before doing more pottering around my own house and garden. The week culminated in a big 40th birthday party of a friend, which meant a night away in Harrogate, before starting the Christmas knitting in front of the fire (and Doctor Who, of course) yesterday. It has been such a lovely holiday, and I feel refreshed and ready for the next couple of months.

But for now, let me leave you with one last photo of the skirt. The sewalong begins tomorrow, and you’ll find full photographed tutorials to accompany the pattern published every Tuesday in November. Do let me know if you make one, and how you get on. It’s always a pleasure to hear from you!

Madeleine

Do you have a good basic skirt pattern in your collection? Which patterns do you turn to again and again?

Little Flurries – we have a winner!

I’m delighted to announce that my Little Flurries sweater pattern is now available via my Ravelry shop and also my Etsy shop! Please see this post for further details of this 1-5 years beginners’ knitting pattern.

Thank you so much to Carol and Susanne for entering my Little Flurries giveaway. As there were just a couple of entrants, it seems churlish to pick just one, so you both have a pattern on its way to you. Happy knitting!

Madeleine

A Lined A-Line Skirt – we have a winner!

First of all, thank you to everyone who entered the ‘A Lined A-Line Skirt’ giveaway. Your interest and support is much appreciated, as always.

Congratulations to Kathleen, who is the winner! Please check your inbox for an email from me.

The launch date of the pattern has been amended ever so slightly from today to Monday 5 November. Thank you for your patience and understanding. I will post a link to it in my Etsy shop as soon as it is available for purchase.

Have a great weekend!

Madeleine

Little Flurries knitalong part one: gathering and swatching

Welcome to the Little Flurries knitalong! I’m so pleased that you’re making one, and hope that these tutorials make it a fun and confidence-building experience for the even the newest of knitters. The pattern has been designed to be as simple as possible, while still incorporating lots of details to make it a cosy, cute and comfortable sweater for the little people in your life. It is suitable for confident beginners, and assumes that you can cast on, knit, purl and bind off.

Rest assured that these tutorial posts will stay up on the blog for free indefinitely, so there’s no need to rush. Take your time and feel free to leave a comment with any questions or suggestions you might have. If you’d like to receive email notifications of future tutorials and other posts, sign up in the Join Our Community box in the sidebar/ near the bottom of your phone screen. Oh, and don’t be confused by the changing yarn colour. It seems silly to photograph and write up the process of swatching for every different design I make, so I’ve used some photos from the Snow Day tutorial, as well as some new ones.

The yarn that I’ve chosen for Little Flurries is Drops Karisma, for a number of reasons. First, it’s pure wool, which provides the structure and warmth that the pattern calls for. However, I was careful to choose a superwash wool, because I know from first hand experience that most busy parents do not have time to hand wash baby knits. Karisma can go in your machine on a delicates cycle at 40 degrees. Thank goodness for that.

However, like most superwash yarns, Karisma does have a tendency to g-r-0-w, so don’t say I didn’t warn you. For this reason, I strongly recommend that you wash and dry your swatch as you would wash the finished jumper. Then you can pick a smaller size/ change needles as necessary.

Second, it’s a DK yarn. When I designed this pattern’s big sister, Snow Day, I wanted a thick enough yarn to make it almost chunky, and ended up choosing Drops Alaska, which is an aran weight. That would have been far too thick for little people, though – I’m not sure they would be able to move their arms in 2×2 aran weight ribbing! – so I scaled down to a double knitting weight instead.

Third, I loved the colour range. Karisma comes in lots of bold and bright colours, perfect for cheering up a grey and wintry day. (Ignore the pinks in my box above; they were part of the same delivery but for a different project.)

Finally, it’s inexpensive and widely available. We don’t all have big budgets for expensive yarn and overseas shipping costs – although it’s lovely if we do – and I wanted everyone to be able to make this little jumper.

 

If you’d like to make your jumper in another yarn – perhaps an acrylic for those sensitive to wool, or a more luxurious yarn for a special gift – go for it. I’d love to see how they turn out. Just make sure that it has a fairly rounded structure (3 plies or more) to make the bobbles and ribbing pop, and that it has a gauge of 21 stitches and 28 rows over 4×4 inches/ 10×10 cm.

Once you’ve got your wool, you’ll need to determine what size needles to work with. Cast on 21 stitches using the size recommended on the ball band – 4mm for Drops Karisma. Work in stocking stitch as this is the main stitch used (knit 1 row, turn, purl next row) for 28 rows. This is enough to establish the width and length of your knitted swatch. Gently uncurl the edges and hold it flat, without stretching it at all. Measure the width. It should be 10cm almost exactly – you can see from the photo below that mine is.

But what if it isn’t? Not to worry. We all knit with different tension, and even needles purporting to be the same size can differ. All you do is go up a needle size (if your swatch was under 10cm), or down a size (if it was over 10cm).  Knit two rows (no purling) to create a garter stitch line across your swatch. It should now look like the photo below (see that row of purl stitches at the very top?).

Carry on in stocking stitch again, until you’ve done another 28 rows and can measure your swatch again. Keep adjusting your needle size until your swatch measures 10 cm across. Here you can see that by changing up a needle size, the same number of stitches yielded over 11cm, instead of 10. Needle size makes a big difference.

 Don’t worry overly about how many rows you knit per 10cm, as long as you are in the right ballpark (28 rows per 10cm). The pattern will tell you how long each part needs to be, not how many rows to knit (apart from at the hem and neckline). The important thing is to use the right sized needles to be able to consistently knit 10cm across with 21 stitches. I used 4mm needles with the Drops Karisma. Wool and knitters vary. As long as your gauge is right, your jumper will fit.

You will also need a pair of needles 1mm smaller than the size you have decided upon. You don’t need to swatch with these needles, as they are just for the collar, sleeves and hem. For example, because my larger needles (the ones I swatched for) are 4mm, I’m going to use 3mm needles every time the pattern calls for my smaller needles.

Having said that I never wash and block my swatches, you should when trying out a superwash yarn, because it does stretch – quite a lot. Many people suggest putting superwash items in the dryer to shrink them back to size; I don’t have one. Instead, I pressed mine gently, using a pressing cloth. Whatever you plan to do, try it out on your swatch first. Then you won’t get any horrible surprises when you finally wash your finished jumper.

Speaking of the back, that tutorial – including photos – will be available next week, same time, same place. Hopefully you’ll have gathered your wool and needles and made your swatch by then. If you have any questions at all, you can either post them in the comments below, or send me an email direct at mrscecilygraham@gmail.com. In the meantime, why not snap the odd photo of your parcel of wool arriving/ swatching in front of the fire/ general knitting love and send them to me so that I can include them in next week’s post? Alternatively, you can add your photos to your Ravelry account. I look forward to seeing all the yarn that everyone chooses!

Madeleine

Who are you making your Little Flurry for? And which of the options for the front have you chosen?

A small, sustainable wardrobe: practical knitting

A series about the clothes we wear and the impact they have both on us and the world around us.

***

My copy of Practical Knitting Illustrated: The Key to Hundreds of Garments You Can Make Yourself doesn’t have a date inside. Looking at it, I thought it looked quite 1940s, and the fact that all the illustrations are black and white would fit that theory. A quick internet search gave me one copy dated to 1947, which sounds about right.

I don’t think that a volume entitled Practical anything would sell particularly well nowadays. Despite the resurgence in craft, knitting and dressmaking patterns seem to be sold as novel! easy! quick! or fun! This book doesn’t claim to be any of those things – although it does bill some of the resulting items as such. Instead, it focuses on how hardwearing, warm, comfortable and versatile the garments inside will be. And although I wouldn’t want to wear all of the garments listed (a knitted beach suit, anyone?), those are the values that I like to apply to my own designs.

It goes without saying that British knitters of the late 1940s were approaching their craft from a rather different place than we do today. At the height of rationing, each adult civilian was entitled to the equivalent to one new set of clothes and shoes a year. Clothes – and materials – rationing was on the cusp of coming to a close, but there would continue to be shortages for several years yet. Although you could theoretically go out and buy whatever your wardrobe needed after 15 March 1949, you were unlikely to be able to in practice. Goods in short supply were managed by price control. Despite this, clothes were expensive and had to be made to last.

This issue is reflected in the advice given on buying yarn. Sold by the ounce, yarn quantities are one of the most confusing things about vintage patterns because how long is an ounce of wool? It seems that it depended on the quality, and readers were instructed to buy the best they could afford. The best qualities although more expensive to buy, are cheaper because they go farther in the knitting through having more rounds to the ounce. And it only took 5 ounces – about 140 grams – of yarn to knit a women’s 2 ply jumper. How’s that for economy of materials?

I would imagine that higher quality yarns would also work out cheaper in the long run because they would wear better and not need to be replaced as quickly – saving both money and labour.

It’s the labour in the book that I can’t quite understand. Although the book pictures 24 different types of yarn, it’s clear that finer yarns were the order of the day. Shetland yarns – which I assume were like the traditional Shetland jumperweight 2 ply yarns still available today – cannot be recommended too highly. Having knit a 2 ply fair isle allover myself, I know how much longer it takes to knit a jumper in a finer yarn. John’s cabled cardigan – in DK as it was – nearly finished me off. Yet here, women (because this book is clearly aimed at women) are encouraged to knit everything for the entire family. No wonder virtues such as hardwearing and plenty of room to grow were included in the descriptions of products. Keeping a family in vests and socks must have been a Herculean task indeed.

I don’t suppose that any women, no matter how dedicated, fulfilled all their family’s requirements in this way. I’m told that my husband’s grandmother, who must have bought or received this book as a newlywed, was a prizewinning knitter, and I would love to have been able to ask her about what she did and didn’t knit for her family. While I keep myself in socks, other people receive them from me as gifts rather than as a matter of course. I’ve never knit a vest (undershirt) in my life. But baby knits and children’s jumpers? Yes, I’ve knit many of those in my time and it’s true: the more hardwearing, warm, comfortable and versatile they are, the more wear they’ve had by one child after another.

I’m as guilty as anyone of wanting things done yesterday. I knit almost a whole jumper in a weekend recently. And yes, it is hardwearing, warm, comfortable and versatile. But I didn’t enjoy making it more because it was fast! In fact, I definitely enjoyed it less. So when I cast on for a new pair of socks last night, I opened Practical Knitting for company, and enjoyed its words of wisdom on the subject of socks for your sons. These three-quarter length socks are excellent for sturdy schoolboys who are always on their feet, it told me. For holiday times, make them with Fair Isle tops. Now if that isn’t taking pride in your craft and making the most of the materials you have, I don’t know what is. Practical doesn’t have to be boring. It can be as fun and creative as you like. Just like the rest of the deeply practical wardrobe I aspire to.

Madeleine

Joining in with Ginny’s Yarn Along at Small Things

Do you prefer to make things quickly or slowly? What’s the most painstakingly made thing in your wardrobe? Did you make it yourself? And is it practical?