Introducing Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers

Like many others, I greet the autumn with wool in hand, my to-knit list growing faster than I get get through it. But by the time December arrives, my appetite for knitting is sated somewhat, and I start planning my New Year sewing.

I love to sew in the cold and crisp new year. The winter is the only time when I can fully turn my back on the garden, and so any spare daylight hours can be given over, guilt free, to sewing. We light the big stove in the dining room and I’m happy in there all day, cutting and pressing at the big table before moving to the armchair in the bay to hand finish garments in the last of the afternoon light.

I do almost all our sewing for the year in the winter months. By February, the emphasis is very much on summer clothing: simple cotton frocks and skirts and whatever else is needed. I like to have an easy quilt on the go, so that I can make a block here or there when a spot of making is required and I don’t have time to dive into dressmaking. But in January, you’ll usually find me making any winter clothes that my wardrobe is lacking. And this year, what was lacking was most definitely a warm pair of versatile trousers.

These trousers are inspired by all those button-up trousers that men wear in period dramas – you know, the pale beige trews sported by Mr Darcy and his friend Bingley, for example. Rather than a complicated fit involving a fly, or the unflattering bulk of an elastic waist, I wanted a simple button front. I also wanted a appealing cut, and the simple lines of peg trousers look elegant on everyone, in my opinion. The beauty of this design is that the button closure, combined with the easy fit of the peg style, means that you don’t have to worry about fit. Simply make your trousers in the correct size, try them on, and sew the buttons in the right place for a perfect fit. Trouser fitting doesn’t get any easier than this.

I made my first pair of these last winter, from a gorgeous dotted chambray, using scraps of Liberty Maybelle for the pockets. As you can see from the photos, they look equally good styled for older and younger models. The lovely Ella wore them in a way I never would, and I loved their funked-up cool. In fact, I loved them so much that I wanted a version to carry me through the cooler months, so made another pair from a soft wool tweed. They work equally well in any soft and drapey fabric and are ridiculously comfortable. What’s more, they look good with everything. Dress them up with heels for work, or down with boots, pumps or sandals for home. Make the pockets from scraps of something beautiful, as they do peek out in the most delightful way. They also provide the all-important modesty needed with button-up trousers, ensuring that there’s no chance of an unfortunate gaping moment. And because these are a feminine take on the style, and we all know who was really in charge in that particular marriage, I’ve named them after Miss Elizabeth Bennett as was.

This is very much a beginner trouser pattern. If you can sew straight lines and curves on a machine, you can make these. There is some pleating involved around the waistline, and pockets to insert, but these are clearly explained. As you might expect, I’ve put together a fully-photographed tutorial which will be published beginning in January on this blog, and will remain freely available thereafter.

I’d like to run a little giveaway for this pattern, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a free copy, please leave a comment below. To be eligible to win, you need to tell me who you are making the trousers for, and whether or not they will be your first pair. The deadline for entries is midnight (GMT) on Wednesday 9 January 2019. I’ll announce the winner on Thursday 10 January, which is also the day that the pattern will become available in my Etsy shop. The tutorials will be published over four Fridays from Friday 11 January.

Madeleine

Who would you make these trousers for? Will they be your first pair? Leave a comment answering both these questions to be eligible to win a free copy of the pattern.

Little Flurries knitalong part five: making up

Hello, and welcome to the fifth and final post of the Little Flurries knitalong! This week you are going to be making up your sweaters. Don’t worry, though, if you aren’t at this stage yet. These posts will remain up indefinitely, so you can come back and use this tutorial whenever you’re ready, free of charge.

When I was designing Little Flurries, I knew that I needed a child-friendly neckline. Toddlers heads are disproportionately large, and there are few things more annoying than spending ages knitting a jumper and finding that it won’t go over the recipient’s head. (Yes, I’ve been there.) So I went for a lovely, traditional envelope neckline, which will stretch really wide to go on, but then sit snug and warm over the little person’s shoulders.

The making up starts with this neckline. Lay out your front and back pieces as shown in the photo below. It’s really important that the back shoulder pieces lie on top of the front ones.

You need to overlap the pieces enough so that the curve of the necklines just about meet, like so:

Once you’re happy with your layout, pin the edges of the sweater front and back to the pointed ends of the shoulders:

I started with the right shoulder.

Next, you need to sew these pieces together. The shoulder pieces are actually quite curvy, so don’t expect them to lie flat. Using your fingers and your common sense, start with the tail of yarn at one end and sew the shoulders together, adjusting the fabric as you go.

This isn’t a seam that’s going to be opened out, so you just sew up and down through both layers. Try to make sure that you pick up a whole stitch on both pieces each time. You can see me doing this in the photo below. However, that isn’t always possible, particularly on the pointed ends.

Keep going until you have sewn the shoulders together. The edge should start to look nice and neat in your wake:

When you reach the end of the seam, weave in your end to secure it.

Now you need to find the centre, or topmost point, of the shoulder. Carefully rearrange your sweater pieces so that the neckline is sitting nicely and, using a knitting needle, extend the line from where the front and back meet around the neck to the outer edge of the shoulder. Mark this point with a safety pin.

Now fold the top of your sleeve in half (vertically) to find its centre, and pin the centre of the sleeve to the centre of the shoulder, as shown below.

IMPORTANT: If you have knitted the foldover ‘mitten’ extensions onto the bottoms of your sleeves, make sure that they both lie towards the back of the jumper.

Next you need to measure the specified length from the centre of the shoulder to find where the back underarm point will be. Use your tape measure to find this point, like so: (Ignore the fact that the image is mirrored – it is correct like this.)

Attach the back corner of the sleeve top to this point with another safety pin, and do the same on the front of the sleeve and sweater. Your sweater should look like mine, below.

The rest of the sleeve and body is sewn together in exactly the same way as the Snow Day jumper, so I’ve used that tutorial below. Please don’t be alarmed by the sudden change in the colour of the yarn; it’s just a different sweater. The instructions are correct!

Cut a long piece of yarn and thread it through your tapestry needle. Pull it through the centre of the sleeve top and the shoulder seam, stopping halfway. You’re going to sew the sleeve from the shoulder seam to the armpit in one direction, and then the other, using the same length of yarn. I tend to sew towards the left first, because I am right handed.

Sew the sleeve to the body. The body stitches are easy: stay one stitch (one complete V) in from the edge and pick up the little bit of yarn than runs across the back of the stitches. You can see me picking this up in this photo, below:

The ‘knit’ stitches of the ribbing are picked up as little Vs. The ‘purl’ stitches are harder to pick up as neatly. Just stay a full stitch (two bits of yarn) in from the edge, don’t pull your stitches too tight and honestly, don’t sweat it. Trust me, as long as you get the stitches on the body right, and keep the sleeve spread evenly against the body, the sleeve will look fabulous. Here’s mine:

and of course it will look even better after blocking.

Do the same to the other sleeve.

Now it’s time to sew down the side seam. Align the top of the garter stitch notches on both the front and the back edges, like so:

and pin in place. You’ll notice that the back of the jumper is longer than the front; this is as it should be. Pin the seam, making sure that it is evenly joined all the way from the top of the notch to the underarm.

This is a really easy seam to sew. Just stay one stitch (V) in from the edge and pick up those little horizontal strands of yarn that are hiding behind the stitches. The rows should match up almost exactly. If not, just skip the odd row on either the front or the back, keeping things nice and smooth and even. Again, don’t pull your stitches too tight.

See? The seam is almost invisible already, and it will disappear altogether after blocking.

Now sew up the other side seam.

Finally, it’s time to sew up the sleeve seams. Pin them, taking care to match the bottom edge and the decreases that you made.

Starting at the armpit, thread either a long tail of yarn or a new length and start to sew the seam together. You’ll notice that there are two knit stitches by the edge on one side (looking very neat and V-ish) and two purl stitches on the other side (looking very chaotic). Starting with the purl side, pick up a horizontal strand – or something similar, it really doesn’t matter that much – one stitch in from the edge. Here I am doing this:

On the other, tidy knit stitch side, pick up a horizontal strand. Take care to work exactly one stitch in from the edge, so that you have two lovely neat columns of Vs left outside of the seam:

The reason for this is that when you’ve made a few stitches and pulled them through, it looks virtually seamless:

See? The knit two purl two rib is uninterrupted. However, let’s be honest, this is a seam which is in the recipient’s armpit. Anyone who’s looking that closely probably loves them enough not to mind if your seams are a bit wobbly.

Carry on down the length of the sleeve. May I remind you one last time not to pull those stitches too tight? You’ll find that the increases mean that you have more or fewer knit and purl stitches on each side, and that sometimes the knit stitches and purl stitches even end up on opposite sides to where they started! It really doesn’t matter. Keep stitching things together, one stitch in from the edge, and you’ll end up with a lovely sleeve seam like this:

If you are making a jumper with foldover mittens, you need to fold the mitten extension up onto the outside of the back of the sleeve, and pin it in place along the sleeve seam and the vertical centre fold of the sleeve. Starting at the underarm, sew the seam in the same way as you sewed the side seams. (Sew the vertical mitten seams, but do not sew the horizontal top opening of the mitten shut.) Do the same to the other sleeve.

Now it’s time to weave in all those ends.

There is no magic way to weave ends in, but here are my top tips:

  1. if the end is within spitting distance of a seam, wend your way over there and then go up and down the seam a bit,
  2. 4 inches is plenty to weave in,
  3. work on the wrong side but remember to keep checking the right side in case you can see the woven in end,
  4. work in one direction for a few stitches (up, or left) and then the opposite direction (down or right) before changing direction again, and
  5. resist the urge to tie knots.

As you feel that each end is woven in, snip it off with an inch to spare. The end will adjust when you block it, and then you can snip it right off. This bit of extra length stops it annoyingly poking out or getting loose after blocking.

To block your jumper, soak it in lukewarm (tepid) water for about half an hour – it should be sopping wet. Drain the water and press the jumper against the sides of the basin to get rid of excess water. Lift the jumper out, taking care not to let any parts of it dangle or stretch. Lay it out on a clean towel, roll it up in the towel, and press (or stand!) on it to get the water out of the jumper and into the towel.

By now it should just be damp, rather than soaking. You need a flat surface that won’t be damaged by (or cause damage to) a damp jumper. Take some time to arrange the jumper on this surface, smoothing out any lumps and bumps and making sure that the neckline is lying just so. Use your tape measure to make sure that it is the right width and length. Then leave it to dry.

However, if you’ve knit this in the superwash wool specified in the pattern, and you washed and dried your swatch in a different way, then you should be fine to go ahead and wash and dry the sweater in that way also.

Doing this ‘sets’ the stitches – if you unravelled them now they would be very wiggly indeed. This helps the jumper to hold its shape. It also evens out any uneven stitches in your knitting and smooths the seams.

 

 

Little Flurries knitalong part four: the sleeves

Welcome back for the next Little Flurries tutorial. This week you’re going to make the sleeves. Because little people’s arms are so small, you’re going to use your smaller needles. This will ensure that the ribbing stays nice and stretchy, keeping their arms warm but unencumbered.

You cast on at the top of the sleeves. It is vital that you use a stretchy cast on, and one of your larger needles, as you’re going to need this cast on edge to be able to stretch right around the armscye. If you already have a stretchy cast on that you like to use, then go ahead and cast on the correct number of stitches on one of your larger needles. If not, I’ve included some instructions for a stretchy cast on method here.

Make a slip knot and  place it on one of your larger needles, like so:

Make sure you’ve left a long tail, as you’re going to use the yarn from your tail – as well as from the ball – to create the cast on stitches.

Arrange your yarn so that the ball is on your right and the long tail on your left. Then, holding the needle in one hand (or under your arm, if you’re an Irish lever knitter like me) use your left hand to create a diamond as shown in the photograph below. Make sure that your thumb and forefinger are holding out the sides of the diamond.

Move your needle so that it is pointing towards your thumb:

keep going until it goes past and over the yarn held out by your thumb, and then bring it back towards the centre again, going under the outer strand of yarn in the process. It should look like the photo below.

Now keep the needle moving towards the right, so that it goes past and over the yarn held out by your forefinger:

and again, bring it back in so that it comes under the top strand of yarn held out by your forefinger, picking it up on the way, as shown below.

Now take the loop of yarn on your thumb and pass it over the pointy end of your needle:

until you’ve looped it over the top.

Now you can let go of both of your ends and pull them tight. You’ve made a beautifully stretchy cast on stitch. Ta da!

Keep casting on in this way until you’ve got enough stitches on your larger needle. Then, picking up one of your smaller needles, work the first row of the sleeve, which is in 2×2 rib (knit 2, purl 2, etc). Don’t forget that you need your working yarn to be at the back for a knit stitch and at the front for a purl stitch.

Keep going until you’ve worked all the stitches in that row. Then put away your larger needle and work the rest of the sleeve on your pair of smaller needles.

The pattern will tell you how many inches to work before it’s time to start decreasing. You’re going to use exactly the same decreases as you used to shape the envelope necks on the front and back: a combination of k2tog (knitting two stitches together), p2tog (purling two stitches together), ssk (slipping two stitches knitwise and then knitting them together through the  back loop) and ssp (slipping two stitches knitwise and then purling them together through the back loop).

Don’t worry about whether the stitches you are working are knit stitches (i.e. wearing little V-neck sweaters) or purl stitches (wearing turtlenecks). Just follow the pattern as instructed. It’s written so that the 2×2 rib continues uninterrupted, despite the increases.

Here’s a quick reminder of how to work those stitches.

k2tog: simply insert your needle into two stitches instead of one, and knit them at the same time.

p2tog: Bring your yarn to the front, ready to purl.

Insert your needle as you normally would to purl, but instead of just inserting it through one stitch, you need to insert it through two stitches at the same time:

Then purl those two stitches, just as if you were purling one normal stitch.

ssk: slip the next stitch onto your right needle as if you were going to knit it – but don’t work it at all. You can see my needle, inserted as if to knit, below. We are slipping stitches knitwise again in order to twist them around.

Do the same for the next stitch. You can see two slipped stitches on my right needle, below.

Now you are going to knit those two stitches together, but ‘through the back loop’. You do this by inserting your left needle into both stitches at the same time, from right to left. I find it easiest to hold my needles almost parallel:

Once your left needle is inserted, move it so that your needles are perpendicular again, and knit those two stitches together as if you were knitting a normal stitch. You can see my needles in position, ready to do this, below. Then just knit those two stitches as if they were one.

ssp: In order to make the decreases point in the right direction, you need to twist them by slipping them onto your right needle as if you were going to knit them. So you insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if you were going to knit it, as shown here:

and just slip it off your left needle. Do this again, and you should have two slipped (but not worked) stitches with all those purled stitches on your right needle. You can see them in the photograph below.

Next, you need to get those two stitches back onto your left needle, so that you can work them. But you don’t want to twist them back to how they were in the first place. So you need to insert your left needle into both stitches, from left to right, and slip them straight back onto the left needle. You can see how I’ve inserted my left needle to do this, below. Don’t work those stitches at all, yet.

You can see in the picture below that they are back on my left needle, in their new orientation, and not worked.

Now it’s finally time to work those two stitches. You need to insert your right needle into them ‘through the back loop’. This means that you insert your needle as if to purl, but you pick up both stitches at the same time, and you insert your needle from the left hand side at the back. It might all feel a bit tight and awkward, but persevere. You can see my right needle inserted in the picture below.

Then you just purl those two stitches together, as if you were purling one normal stitch.

Once all your decreases have been made, and you’ve knitted to the length specified by the pattern, you’ll have a choice about what sort of cuff you want to work. If you want to just make a normal sweater cuff, cast off loosely when you reach the specified length.

However, if you want to work a foldover-mitten cuff, cast off (loosely) only half the stitches of the sleeve at this point. Keep working the remaining stitches for the specified length. Then, once you’ve done that, you can cast off the remaining stitches (loosely).

Have fun working your sleeves, and see you next week for the ‘making up’ tutorial!

Madeleine

Have you used any of these techniques before making this jumper? Are there any that you’ll adopt for future knitting projects?

Little Flurries – we have a winner!

I’m delighted to announce that my Little Flurries sweater pattern is now available via my Ravelry shop and also my Etsy shop! Please see this post for further details of this 1-5 years beginners’ knitting pattern.

Thank you so much to Carol and Susanne for entering my Little Flurries giveaway. As there were just a couple of entrants, it seems churlish to pick just one, so you both have a pattern on its way to you. Happy knitting!

Madeleine

Snow Day knitalong part 5: making up

In the photo above I’m wearing one of my auntie Fiona’s lovely hand crocheted snoods. She makes all sorts of vintage-inspired items, from gorgeous snoods to new baby bunting and traditional Irish willow baskets to modern Christmas trees. You can find her in Derry’s Craft Village, or online.

Welcome to the last tutorial of the Snow Day knitalong. This week you’re going to be making up the jumper: knitting the neckline and sewing all the different parts together.

You start by laying the front and back right side up, with the right shoulder edges together. These are the bound off stitches which will sit on your right shoulder. Thread your tapestry needle with some yarn, either straight from the ball, or a tail.

Insert your needle under the first bound off stitch on the front shoulder. You’ll get a neater finish if you insert your needle under a stitch that looks like an A, rather than a V.

Now do the same with the first bound off stitch on the back shoulder (ignore the red thing; it’s just the circular needle that I was holding my live neck stitches on):

Work your way across the shoulder seam in this way, until you’ve sewn five or six stitches. Your yarn will still be very loose, like this:

Gently pull the yarn through, so that the shoulder seam is neatly drawn together. Don’t pull so hard that you cause the shoulder seam to bunch up, though.

The seam should be virtually invisible. Carry on like this until you reach the end of the seam, then stop, leaving the tail of the yarn hanging for now.

Next, you are going to knit the garter stitch neckline. With the wrong side facing, and starting at the left hand side of the front, transfer all the live stitches along the front neck to one of your smaller needles.

Continue along the back neck, doing exactly the same thing, until all the live stitches around the neckline are on one (smaller) needle.

Join a new ball of yarn (by looping it over the end of your needle with a tail of six inches or so) and knit all the way along the row.

When you reach the end of the row, turn your work and knit the next row. You are making a garter stitch neckline. Continue until you have knitted four rows in total.

Using one of your larger needles in your right hand, bind off all of the stitches (in knit) along the neckline.

Try to keep your stitches reasonably loose – don’t pull them very tight. They don’t need to be anything  like as loose as the ones you bound off along the top of the sleeves, but nor do you want an inflexible neckline. After you’ve done a bit, stop and pull on it. It shouldn’t be stretchy, but it should have a bit of give and look nice and neat. Mine is pictured below.

Keep going until you reach the end of the row. Cut your yarn and pull the tail through the final stitch. The top of your jumper (sweater) should now look like this:

One shoulder seam is sewn and the other is not. Sew up the other shoulder seam in exactly the same way as the first.

Bear in mind that you’ll also need to sew together the two edges of the garter stitch neckline that you’ve just knitted. You do this by working your way back and forth in the same way as you did the shoulder, only there aren’t nice even As to stitch together. However, garter stitch is very forgiving. Work one whole stitch (two bits of yarn) in from the edge, like so:

You’ll find that there is a small gap at either edge of the front neckline, like this:

You need to weave a bit of yarn gently in and out of the fabric at the back of this, to pull the edges of the gap together. There’s no specific way of doing this, but it helps if you incorporate the adjacent stitches as well. Here I am, doing some weaving:

Don’t fret about it; just have a go. It’s only knitting, after all, and you’ll be surprised how easy this is. Before you know it, the gap will have disappeared and no-one will ever know it was there.

Leave all your ends for now; you’ll weave them in later.

Now it’s time to attach the sleeves. Lay your jumper out, right side up, and measure the distance indicated in the pattern down both the front and the back sides. I’ve marked the distances here with knitting needles but safety pins would have been more sensible…

Find the centre top of your sleeve and align it with the shoulder seam. Pin the sleeve to the body between the two markers (in my case, knitting needles) and spread the ribbing out evenly. Pin it in place.

Cut a long piece of yarn and thread it through your tapestry needle. Pull it through the centre of the sleeve top and the shoulder seam, stopping halfway. You’re going to sew the sleeve from the shoulder seam to the armpit in one direction, and then the other, using the same length of yarn. I tend to sew towards the left first, because I am right handed.

Sew the sleeve to the body. The body stitches are easy: stay one stitch (one complete V) in from the edge and pick up the little stitch than runs across the back of the stitches. You can see me picking this up in this photo, below:

The ‘knit’ stitches of the ribbing are picked up as little Vs – kind of like you picked up the shoulder seam stitches as little As. The ‘purl’ stitches are harder to pick up as neatly. Just stay a full stitch (two bits of yarn) in from the edge, don’t pull your stitches too tight and honestly, don’t sweat it. Trust me, as long as you get the stitches on the body right, and keep the sleeve spread evenly against the body, the sleeve will look fabulous. Here’s mine:

and of course it will look even better after blocking.

Do the same to the other sleeve.

Now it’s time to sew down the side seam. Align the top of the garter stitch notches on both the front and the back edges, like so:

and pin in place. You’ll notice that the back of the jumper is longer than the front; this is as is should be. Pin the seam, making sure that it is evenly joined all the way from the top of the notch to the underarm.

This is a really easy seam to sew. Just stay one stitch (V) in from the edge and pick up those little horizontal strands of yarn that are hiding behind the stitches. The rows should match up almost exactly. If not, just skip the odd row on either the front or the back, keeping things nice and smooth and even. Again, don’t pull your stitches too tight.

See? The seam is almost invisible already, and it will disappear altogether after blocking.

Now sew up the other side seam.

Finally, it’s time to sew up the sleeve seams. Pin them, taking care to match the bottom edge and the increases that you made. If you’re going down the extra-long-sleeve-with-thumbhole route (and it is very cosy), mark four inches and two inches from the bottom of the sleeve as well.

Starting at the armpit, thread either a long tail of yarn or a new length and start to sew the seam together. You’ll notice that there are two knit stitches by the edge on one side (looking very neat and V-ish) and two purl stitches on the other side (looking very chaotic). Starting with the purl side, pick up a horizontal strand – or something similar, it really doesn’t matter that much – one stitch in from the edge. Here I am doing this:

On the other, tidy knit stitch side, pick up a horizontal strand. Take care to work exactly one stitch in from the edge, so that you have two lovely neat columns of Vs left outside of the seam:

The reason for this is that when you’ve made a few stitches and pulled them through, it looks virtually seamless:

See? The knit two purl two rib is uninterrupted. However, let’s be honest, this is a seam which is in your armpit. Anyone who’s looking that closely probably loves you enough not to mind if your seams are a bit wobbly.

Carry on down the length of the sleeve. May I remind you one last time not to pull those stitches too tight? You’ll find that the increases mean that you have more or fewer knit and purl stitches on each side, and that sometimes the knit stitches and purl stitches even end up on opposite sides to where they started! It really doesn’t matter. Keep stitching things together, one stitch in from the edge, and you’ll end up with a lovely sleeve seam like this:

By the way, if you are including a thumb hole on a longer sleeve, stop four inches before the bottom edge and backstitch a bit along the seam that you’ve just sewn, to secure the end of your yarn. Then use the tail from the cast on edge of the sleeve to sew the seam upwards, towards the thumbhole, for two inches. This will leave a two inch hole for your thumb.

Do the same to the other sleeve.

Put your jumper on, crazy ends trailing everywhere, and spend a long time admiring yourself in it. Don’t worry about any little imperfections; a good blocking goes a long way.

When you’re ready, take it off again, put on a good film and weave in all those ends.

There is no magic way to weave ends in, but here are my top tips:

  1. if the end is within spitting distance of a seam, wend your way over there and then go up and down the seam a bit,
  2. 4 inches is plenty to weave in,
  3. work on the wrong side but remember to keep checking the right side in case you can see the woven in end,
  4. work in one direction for a few stitches (up, or left) and then the opposite direction (down or right) before changing direction again, and
  5. resist the urge to tie knots.

As you feel that each end is woven in, snip it off with an inch to spare. The end will adjust when you block it, and then you can snip it right off. This bit of extra length stops it annoyingly poking out or getting loose after blocking.

To block your jumper, soak it in lukewarm (tepid) water for about half an hour – it should be sopping wet. Drain the water and press the jumper against the sides of the basin to get rid of excess water. Lift the jumper out, taking care not to let any parts of it dangle or stretch. Lay it out on a clean towel, roll it up in the towel, and press (or stand!) on it to get the water out of the jumper and into the towel.

By now it should just be damp, rather than soaking. You need a flat surface that won’t be damaged by (or cause damage to) a damp jumper. Take some time to arrange the jumper on this surface, smoothing out any lumps and bumps and making sure that the neckline is lying just so. Use your tape measure to make sure that it is the right width and length. Then leave it to dry.

Doing this ‘sets’ the stitches – if you unravelled them now they would be very wiggly indeed. This helps the jumper to hold its shape. It also evens out any uneven stitches in your knitting and smooths the seams.

Wear with pride. And every time someone compliments you on your lovely new jumper, say, with studied casualness, oh, thanks. I made it myself.

 

 

The Saturdays

As a child, one of the books that I read over and over again was The Saturdays. In Enright’s tale, four New York siblings are bored every Saturday, until they decide to pool their allowance and let one person have an adventure with it each week.

It’s a very long time since I had a long and empty Saturday – what a treat that would be! But, busy as they are, they can still be boring. Between the cleaning and the shopping, the homework and mountain of logs to be stacked, Saturdays can be a bit mundane. This year, though, we seem to have stumbled upon a bit of a plan.

It turns out that a plan was just what we needed. (Who would have guessed?) With the children being the ages that they are, little rhythms have fallen into place. I make a vat of soup, to last the week. John visits the fishmonger, to buy something delicious for tea (moules frites, anyone?) Birthday cards are made and posted. One or another of the children bakes a cake. And then I have a little crafternoon, with anyone who wishes to join me.

It’s only a little crafternoon, because by the time the house is clean and piano practice done and the fridge full up for the week ahead and so on and so forth, there are usually just two or maybe three hours left to play. But that’s enough time, if you’ve planned ahead, to achieve something quick and crafty. Last week, I made beeswax balms. The week before, I worked on my Lionberry shawl while Ilse crocheted a snood with impressive speed. Before that, we made some beeswrap. Having everything to hand, ready to begin, is a wonderful thing. With a bit of preparation, cakes get baked, chairs waxed, pots filled with protective goodness.

This week, inspired by all the fun with beeswax, Ilse suggested that we use the candle-making kit she received for her birthday and, knowing that this Saturday was going to be particularly full of jobs, I agreed. We aren’t really a kit-making family, to be honest. We generally tend to make things up for ourselves. So it was particularly pleasant to set out the chopping board and a couple of sharp knives and look on, knitting in hand, as Ilse and Seb worked their way through all the candles in the kit. Apart from the odd bit of tricky cutting, I wasn’t really needed at all. I was quite happy, then, to nibble my chelsea bun, sip tea, and admire their progress – all the while knitting furiously on another jumper sample.

I worked out that I’ve knit three jumpers in the last month, and cast on for one more yesterday evening. There is no shortage of craft in my life. In fact, I fully intend to do less knitting as soon as the latest pattern is launched, for fear of doing damage to my hands. They are beginning to seize up a bit. So why, you might wonder, would I want to do yet more crafting on a precious Saturday afternoon?

I suppose it’s the difference between work and play: making something just for fun, as opposed to creating something with the intention of publication. Then there’s the family aspect of it – I love watching my children’s creativity. And the pleasure of bashing something out in a couple of hours flat, rather than taking days and days to get it right. Plus the satisfaction of ticking something off the ‘I’d like to…’ list.

Not all Saturday crafternoons are crafty, strictly speaking. Sometimes Fliss draws. We have plans for a Christmas cake quite soon, and a batch of garden chutney. But they are the sort of activities that don’t quite fit anywhere else in our week. Too long for a weekday evening, too short to fill a luxuriously lazy Sunday. As long as we’ve thought ahead and got everything we need, we can make these things in a couple of hours in an otherwise bustling day. Who knows how long it’ll last, how long before no-one wants to sit and knit with me. No doubt the family rhythms will shift again, before long. But for now, this is how we spend our Saturdays.

Madeleine

Please excuse the flatness of these photos – we’ve had high winds, grey skies and lots of rain, none of which are helpful in taking a decent photograph!

How was your weekend? Do you have a rhythm on Saturdays, or is every one different?