Little Flurries knitalong part two: the back

Welcome to the second part of the Little Flurries knitalong. This week, you’re going to be working the back of the sweater. As the bottom hem of the back is identical to that of the Snow Day sweater, I’ve used the text and photos from that tutorial for the first part of this one. However, you’ll notice that the colour of the yarn changes partway through this tutorial. That’s because the neckline of Little Flurries is completely different to the neckline of Snow Day – so that part of the tutorial is brand new.

Let’s begin at the bottom hem. You’ve had a bit of practice casting on and knitting while you were making your swatch, so this should be a breeze. In fact, if you get the first 26 rows done over the weekend, you’ll have lots of lovely mindless stocking stitch to relax with in the evenings throughout the coming week.

The first thing you need to do is cast all the stitches onto your larger needle (the one you swatched for). This just makes knitting that first row much easier, as the stitches will be a bit looser than if you cast them onto your smaller needle. However, the smaller needle is used to knit the rest of the hem. So you literally hold the larger needle (with all the cast on stitches on it) in one hand, and the smaller needle in your other hand. I’m right handed and knit in the UK way, so in the photo below the cast on stitches are on the larger needle (on the left), and I’ve just started to knit them all across onto my smaller needle (on the right).

Done? Right, now before you forget, put that larger needle away and pick up the other smaller needle. You should now be working exclusively with your pair of smaller needles. The pattern tells you to knit some rows of garter stitch. Just to remind you, that means that you knit every row. Don’t purl anything.

Once you’ve knitted the required number of rows of garter stitch, you’re ready to work on the notches. In this next section, you’re going to be knitting stocking stitch in the centre of the work, and garter stitch at either end. It’s actually really easy.

You also need to start using your larger needles again. So pick up one of your large needles and use it to work all the stitches of the following row.

We start on the right side, and just knit the whole row. Put the smaller needle (that you’ve just emptied of stitches) to one side, and pick up your other larger needle. You’re going to be working with your pair of larger needles for the rest of the back. Turn your work.

Then, on the wrong side, you need to knit the first five stitches only. In the photo below, that’s precisely where I’m up to. Can you see how the first five stitches are still in garter stitch? That’s because we’re still knitting both sides of those first five stitches.

However, we want the central section to be stocking stitch, so you need to purl all the way across the row until you are five stitches before the end. Don’t forget to bring your yarn to the front of your work before you start purling, like so:

When you get to those last five stitches, stop. Move your yarn to the back of your work again, ready to knit. Then knit those last five stitches, to create the garter stitch notch on the other side of the back.

Take a look at your work, without turning it. From the wrong side, which you’ve just finished working, it will look like the photo below. Those are the first five knit stitches (on the right), and then the purl stitches stretching off to the left. There will be five more purl stitches on the far left edge of your knitting.

Turn your work, and knit the whole row. By the time you finish this row, your work should look like the photo below, on the right side (the side you’ve just finished working).

Can you see the garter notch beginning to emerge on the right hand side? Work a few more rows (in the same way as the previous two) and it’ll be much clearer:

Carry on in this manner until you’ve worked as many rows as the pattern tells you to. Then stop and have a celebratory drink/ dance/ pat on the back. That’s the hardest part of the back done.

Now all you need to do is work the rest of the back in stocking stitch until it reaches the required length (see the pattern to find out what this is in your chosen size). That means that you knit all the stitches on the right side and purl all the stitches on the wrong side. Easy.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening.

Working the neckline

The first thing that you need to do is knit the garter stitch section at the front of the neckline, while keeping the shoulder sections in stocking stitch. This is much easier than casting off and picking up stitches to work a separate collar.

All you have to do on the first row is knit the whole thing. On the next row, which is a wrong side row, you need to purl the first 17 stitches. This ensures that this bit of the work will remain in stocking stitch. You can see that I’ve done this in the picture below.

Your yarn will be at the front because you’ve been purling. Move it to the back, ready to knit, like so:

and knit all the way to the last 17 stitches. In the photo below you can see the difference between the first, purled, stitches, and the knitted ones. My pencil is pointing at the first knitted stitch.

Bring your yarn to the front again:

and purl the last 17 stitches. Turn your work. It should look like the picture below, with the stitches at either end still in stocking stitch, and the garter stitch edging beginning to emerge in the middle. My pencil is pointing to the place where the change occurs.

Work the next 4 rows in the same way, knitting the right side rows and doing a combination of knit and purl stitches on the wrong side rows, as directed by the pattern. Please note that the number of stitches you purl changes each time.

Now you’re ready to cast off those centre stitches. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern. You can see that I’ve done this, below.

Then knit two more stitches. My metal needle is pointing at the stitch that we are going to bind off first (below). Can you see why you needed to knit two more stitches? If you hadn’t, you would have bound off too early.

Bind off that stitch as normal, by carrying it over the end of your right needle. In the picture below, my metal needle is pointing to the bound off stitch.

Continue to knit one stitch and then bind off the previous stitch until you’ve bound off the required number of stitches. Remember, when binding off you count each stitch as you actually bind it off, not as you knit it. When you’ve done the correct number, you should have one stitch remaining on your right needle (plus the shoulder stitches at the far end) and the number of stitches you are supposed to knit, minus one, on your left needle. You can see this in my photograph below.

Knit the rest of those stitches, and you’ll have the correct number of knit stitches on either side of the bound off section. Your work should look like the photo below. Can you see the two shoulder sections, with the bound off neckline in the middle? (Ignore the bobbles: the front neckline is worked in exactly the same way as the back, so I took these photos while working the front – hence the bobbles.)

The next thing to do is to decrease those shoulder stitches so that they can be sewn together later to form a toddler-friendly envelope neckline.

You are going to work the right shoulder (what would be the right shoulder if someone was wearing it) first. The stitches for the left shoulder will still be on your needle, but just ignore them for now.

The right shoulder actually uses slightly more complicated decreases than the left. They aren’t difficult at all, but it might take you a while to remember them as they have a few steps. However, they are important because they make the collar curve away in the correct direction as the stitches are decreased.

You start with a wrong side row. Purl the number of stitches specified by the pattern. Then stop. This is all I’ve done, below.

Now you need to make your slip, slip, purl (ssp) decrease. In order to make the decreases point in the right direction, you need to twist them by slipping them onto your right needle as if you were going to knit them. So you insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if you were going to knit it, as shown here:

and just slip it off your left needle. Do this again, and you should have two slipped (but not worked) stitches with all those purled stitches on your right needle. You can see them in the photograph below.

Next, you need to get those two stitches back onto your left needle, so that you can work them. But you don’t want to twist them back to how they were in the first place. So you need to insert your left needle into both stitches, from left to right, and slip them straight back onto the left needle. You can see how I’ve inserted my left needle to do this, below. Don’t work those stitches at all, yet.

You can see in the picture below that they are back on my left needle, in their new orientation, and not worked.

Now it’s finally time to work those two stitches. You need to insert your right needle into them ‘through the back loop’. This means that you insert your needle as if to purl, but you pick up both stitches at the same time, and you insert your needle from the left hand side at the back. It might all feel a bit tight and awkward, but persevere. You can see my right needle inserted in the picture below.

Then you just purl that stitch as normal. In the next picture, you can see that the last stitch is just a purl stitch, except that it has purled two stitches into one. That’s the slip, slip, purl stitch (ssp) done.

Move your yarn to the back of your work (as shown below) and knit the rest of the stitches. All of your wrong side rows will be worked in this manner, although the number of stitches to knit and purl varies. Just follow the pattern.

When you get to the end of the row, turn your work. Now you’re going to work the first right side row.

Knit four stitches. Now it’s time to work the slip, slip, knit stitch.

Slip the next stitch onto your right needle as if you were going to knit it – but don’t work it at all. You can see my needle, inserted as if to knit, below. We are slipping stitches knitwise again in order to twist them around – just as we did for the slip, slip, purl stitch.

Do the same for the next stitch. You can see two slipped stitches on my right needle, below.

Now you are going to knit those two stitches together, but ‘through the back loop’. You do this by inserting your left needle into both stitches at the same time, from right to left. I find it easiest to hold my needles almost parallel:

Once your left needle is inserted, move it so that your needles are perpendicular again, and knit those two stitches together as if you were knitting a normal stitch. You can see my needles in position, ready to do this, below.

Then knit the rest of the stitches in the row.

Carry on working all the wrong side rows with the ssp stitch, and the right side rows with the ssk stitch, until you only have one stitch left. Don’t be put off when you have to work an ssp at the start of a new row, or a ssk at the end of a row. Just carry on working the stitches as explained, above. Your work will decrease by one stitch in every row.

Then snip your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch, to secure it. Your right shoulder is done! It should have a nice curve, and the decrease stitches should all point outwards, as below:

Now it’s time to work the left shoulder. You start working this on the wrong side, and you need to rejoin your yarn. The first stitch is a knit stitch (even though you are working into a purl stitch), so insert your needle as if to knit, and lay your yarn across your right needle with the loose end to the left (see below). Knit the first four stitches.

Now you are going to work the ‘purl two together’ (p2tog) stitch. Bring your yarn to the front, ready to purl.

Insert your needle as you normally would to purl, but instead of just inserting it through one stitch, you need to insert it through two stitches at the same time:

Then purl those two stitches, just as if you were purling one normal stitch. That’s the end of the p2tog stitch. Now you just purl to the end of the row.

Turn your work, ready to work a right side row. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern, then stop.

Now it’s time to work the ‘knit two together’ (k2tog) stitch. Insert your right needle into the next two stitches at the same time, from left to right, just as if you were knitting one normal knit stitch.

Then knit the two stitches, exactly as if they were just one normal knit stitch. That’s the k2tog stitch done.

Now knit to the end of the row.

Continue working the wrong side and right side rows just like this, remembering to follow the number of knit and purl stitches for every row, because it changes. Don’t be put off when you have to purl two together at the end of a row, or knit two together at the start of a row. You just do it exactly as you’ve done it before.

Keep going until you only have one stitch left, then cut your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch to secure it.

The left shoulder should look like mine, below, with a tail from the joined-in yarn, and the decreases pointing off to the right.

That’s the back done! Come back next week for the knitalong tutorial for the front – time to start working those bobbles…

Madeleine

Who are you knitting your Little Flurries for? Have you gone for a Christmas tree version, or one of the other options?

 

 

 

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