Little Flurries knitalong part three: the front

Welcome back to the third part of the Little Flurries knitalong. By now, you should have completed the back of the sweater. If not, just carry on with it – this tutorial will be waiting for you whenever you’re ready to get started on the front.

Just so you’re aware, I’ve used the same text and photographs for the first part of this tutorial as in the Snow Day ‘front’ tutorial. This is because the bottom of the front and the bobbles are exactly the same on both sweaters. However, unlike the Snow Day jumper, Little Flurries has a few options for the front.

Option A

If you’ve chosen option A, you just need to refer to last week’s ‘back’ tutorial to see how to create your notched hem. Bear in mind that the notches are shorter on the front than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to knit. Then work in stocking stitch (knit all the right side rows, purl all the wrong side rows) until you reach the desired length. Once you’ve done that, scroll down towards the bottom of this tutorial for instructions on how to work the envelope style neck.

Options B, C and D

For options B, C and D, you also need to know how to make bobbles. Before you do that, however, you need to create your notched hem. It’s shorter than the one for the back, but made in exactly the same way. So head on over to the tutorial for the back, and work your notched hem. Please bear in mind that the front hem is shorter than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to work for the front.

Once you’ve finished the notched section, it’s time to start on the bobbles. Regardless of what colour your bobbles will be made in, they are all made the same way. Read the following instructions, then see the instructions on creating two tone bobbles (option C) and yellow bobbles (option D), below.

You begin by knitting however many stitches the pattern specifies for your size, in order to reach the point where you will make your first bobble. So take a moment to knit to that place, and then have a quick read of all the bobble instructions before making your first bobble.

You’re going to make a bobble out of the next stitch. In the photo below, the metal needle is pointing at the stitch that you are going to make the bobble out of.

Knit the stitch, but don’t slide it off the left needle. In the photo below, the newly knitted stitch is on the right hand needle, but the original stitch is still on the left hand needle (being held on by my index finger). You’ve just made two stitches out of one original stitch.

Put your yarn to the front of your work, so that you are ready to purl.

Now purl into the same stitch (the one that my index finger is touching in the photo above). You can see my inserted needle, ready to purl that stitch, in the photo below.

Again, don’t slide this stitch off your needle. You can now see, as in the photo below, that you have two new stitches (one knit and one purl) on your right hand needle, and still that same original stitch on your left needle (my index finger is holding it in the photo below).

Move your yarn to the back of your work again, as in the photo below.

and knit into this same stitch again, as you can see me doing below.

This time, you are finally allowed to slide that stitch off your left hand needle once you’ve knitted it. So you can see, below, that my thumb is indicating the three new stitches that we’ve made out of that single initial stitch. There’s a purl stitch in the centre, and a knit stitch on either side of it.

Okay? So you’ve turned one stitch into three. This provides the breadth of the bobble. Now we need to give it some height. To do this, we’re going to work just these three new stitches for a couple of rows of stocking stitch, as follows:

Turn your work so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front, so that you are set up like the photo below.

Purl these three stitches.

Turn your work again so that the right side is facing you, and move your yarn to the back, as you can see below.

Knit these three stitches.

Turn the work again so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front once more, as shown in the photo below.

Purl the same three stitches again.

Finally, turn your work so that the right side is facing, and move your yarn to the back again, as shown below.

This is the special bit. You’re going to knit all three of these same stitches together into one stitch. To do this, you literally knit the three stitches as if they were one. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below. In fact, treating all three stitches as one even makes them look as if I’m only knitting one stitch. I’m not; my needle is inserted through all three stitches knitwise (i.e. as if knitting normally) at the same time.

Wrap your working yarn to make a knit stitch as normal, move the right needle under the left as usual and slide all three stitches off the left hand needle as if you were just knitting one stitch.

That’s it! You’ve made a bobble! It’ll look more like a proper bobble once you’ve worked a couple more rows. For now, just knit a few more stitches, keeping count so that you know when to make the next bobble. In the photo below you can see that I’ve knit my bobble stitch, with all that bulk below and to the right of it, and then three more normal knit stitches.

I assure you that it’ll look much more like a proper bobble in a couple of rows’ time, at which point you’ll be able to give it a prod and a poke from behind to make it more rounded and full. For now though, just concentrate on getting to the end of the row. Remember, count your stitches and stop when it’s time to make the next bobble.

By the time you get to the end of your row, it’ll look something like this:

My empty needle is pointing at one of the bobbles.

Carry on in stocking stitch (knit the right side rows, purl the wrong side rows) for the specified number of rows, then work the next bobble row in exactly the same way. You’ll notice that on the next bobble row there are fewer bobbles and more knit stitches in between them.

Option C only

For option C, you make your bobbles in the same colour as the sleeves. In my sample, the bobbles and sleeves are in a dark teal and the body is in an aquamarine colour.

Knit the number of stitches specified before making the first bobble. You are going to make the bobble on the stitch that the empty needle is pointing to, below.

Insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if to knit. Pick up your bobble yarn, and lay it over your right needle, with the ball to your right and the tail to your left. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Using this yarn, work the bobble as explained in the instructions above. You’ll find that you need to pull the tail tight from time to time, but don’t worry if it’s a bit loose. You can make it tight when you weave all your ends in later.

Once you’ve worked the bobble, pick up your body yarn and knit the next stitch. Pull the yarn tight across the back of the bobble as you work this stitch. Then knit either 3 stitches (if there are 7 stitches between your bobbles) or 4 stitches (if there are 8 stitches between your bobbles). Now you want to carry your bobble yarn across the back of your work, so that you don’t have great dangly loops on the inside of the jumper.

Insert your right needle as if to knit, as shown below.

With your left hand, gently bring the bobble yarn across the right needle from right to left, as shown. Your tension is important here. Don’t pull it so tight that your jumper looses its stretch, and don’t leave it so loose that you’ll have a big loop at the back of your work. You’ll know when it feels about right.

Then wrap your body yarn as if to knit that stitch as normal (i.e. from left to right):

before moving your bobble yarn to the right of the needle and downwards, effectively taking it off the needle. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Then finish knitting the stitch as normal. You can see my knitted stitch below. It’s the one furthest to the left on the right hand needle. It should look like a perfectly normal knit stitch in the body yarn.

What this does is twist the bobble yarn into the body yarn at the back of your work, meaning that the bobble yarn is only carried for 3 or 4 stitches before being attached to the jumper again. This way, the loops are kept small and neat, and won’t catch on the child when they are putting the jumper on or taking it off.

Your work should look like mine, below, on the wrong side. Can you see where the bobble yarn has been used to make a bobble (just above my fingernail), and then again when it’s been carried by a normal stitch (at the right end of the work)?

Carry on in this manner until you’ve knit the final bobble of the row. You will probably find that your bobbles are all sitting on the wrong side of your work. This isn’t a problem at all. Once you’ve knit a couple more rows of stocking stitch, you’ll be able to push them through to the right side. Mine all came out on the wrong side:

but I pushed them through later.

Now you have a choice. You can either cut your bobble yarn with a nice long tail and resign yourself to weaving in lots of ends. If you’re new to carrying your yarns, that’s what I’d advise, in case you get your tension wrong on the next row. It’s only a little jumper, so there won’t be too many ends to weave in.

However, if you loathe dealing with ends (I don’t, really), you can continue to carry your bobble yarn all the way to the end of the row, making sure that you attach it to the final stitch, as I’ve done here:

Then, when you turn your work, you need to carry the yarn every few stitches but in reverse, as you will be purling your work. Then, as you work the next 8 rows of stocking stitch, be sure to twist the bobble yarn around the body yarn as you start each knit row, so that the yarn is carried up the side of the jumper. Then the bobble yarn will be in the right place when you go to knit the next bobble row. It’s up to you.

Option D only

Joining the yellow yarn to work the bobbles in a contrast colour is really easy.

Knit the specified number of stitches, working any green bobbles as specified. When you get to the place for a yellow bobble, insert your needle into that stitch as if about to knit it, as below:

and then lay your yellow yarn across your right needle with the tail on the left and the ball of yarn on the right, like so:

Take hold of your yarn and knit that first stitch, remembering not to slide the worked stitch off the needle, as you’re about to purl into that same stitch. Can you see how there’s now a yellow stitch in the photo below?

Keep on working the bobble, as normal. Don’t worry if it looks a bit loose. Mine does, in the photo below, but that’s normal. Feel free to give the tail a pull to tighten things up, and just keep working that bobble.

Once the bobble is done, snip the yellow yarn, leaving a nice long tail of 3-4 inches. You can see in the photo below that my bobble is hiding at the back of my work – again, that’s not a problem.

Knit the next stitch, as normal, and carry on as instructed by the pattern until you reach the end of your row.

My bobble ended up on the wrong side of my work, this time. Can you see it against all those purled stitches on the wrong side, below?

You would barely know it was there, from the front. All you can see in the photo below is a stitch on the needle and what looks like a purl stitch underneath it.

Poke it through from the back, just using your finger,

give those loose ends a gentle tug from the back,

and you’ll have a nice, neat, yellow bobble sitting on the right side of your work.

Don’t worry about the loose ends yet. You’ll weave them in when you make up the sweater.

All options

Carry on knitting the front of your jumper until you reach the length specified for your chosen size, or your desired length (but only if you bought extra wool to allow for extra length). For options B, C and D, don’t worry which row of the bobble-making pattern you finish on; it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that you make a wrong side (even numbered) row the last one you work.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening. This is done in exactly the same way on the front as it was on the back. Head on over to the back tutorial, and follow the instructions from where it says Working the neckline.

There you go! You’ve finished the front and back of your Little Flurries jumper! Just the sleeves to knit now – see you for that tutorial next Friday.

Madeleine

Do you like the way the bobbles look in your chosen colour(s)? Any winning combinations out there? Do make colour suggestions in the comments below!

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