Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part two: assembling the pockets and trouser fronts

Welcome to the second part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. This week you are going to construct each trouser leg separately before sewing them together. For each of the following instructions, repeat them for the other leg.

First of all, you need to insert the pleat in piece 1. Lay piece 1 out with the right side facing upwards. Bring the two solid lines together until they meet, directly on top of the dotted line. Press this (box) pleat, making sure that it is even on the back. Pin this:

and sew down (horizontally), using a straight stitch within the seam allowance, but very close to your marked sewing line.

Now it’s time to construct the pockets. Find the pieces 1 and 4 that face this way, right sides up:

With right sides together, pin and sew pieces 1 and 4 together along seam NA, stopping at #. Start from the top of the trouser front/ pocket, and sew downwards. Here they are pinned:

and sewn:

Now find pieces 3 and 5 that face this way, right side up:

With right sides together, pin and sew pieces 3 and 5 together along seam LP, stopping at *. These seams will feel strange – a bit unevenly matched and bulky. It’s just because they are slightly different curves and lengths. Just pin them carefully. It’s really important that you don’t pull on the fabric when you are sewing curves, as they stretch out of shape quite easily. To combat this, pin them pieces really carefully and feed them gently and slowly through the machine, without pulling on them. You could even hand sew them loosely first, for extra security. It will look nice and flat when you open it out. Here they are pinned:

and sewn:

Next, you need to attach your pocket lining to your pocket piece. Attach pieces 3 and 4 by pinning and sewing seam MO with right sides together. Here they are side by side:

and sewn:

Now arrange the fabric, right side up, so that edge A meets edge P. The pocket fabric should lie beneath the trouser front.

Finally, pin and sew between # and * of the pocket pieces. (Do not attach the pocket pieces to the trouser front at this point.) In this photo, it’s the bit between the pins.

Press all your seams. If you really want to, you can understitch the seams where your pocket meets the trouser fabric, to stop the pocket fabric from rolling out. But I don’t like to: the pockets are made to gape slightly and show off the pocket fabric.

Madeleine

What fabrics have you chosen for your pockets? I’d love to know!

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part one: preparation and cutting out

Welcome to the first part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. This week you’re going to assemble the paper pattern, choose your size and cut out your fabric pieces.

Before you begin, please make sure that you’ve washed and ironed your fabric. That way your beautiful new trousers won’t shrink and warp the first time you put them through the wash.

Now measure yourself (or whoever the intended recipient is), and choose the right size. Please don’t get hung up on what size you normally are in the shops; just go for whichever hip and waist size best describes you.

Now you’re ready to assemble the paper pattern. There are full instructions attached to the paper pattern – please do take the time to read them. They are entitled How to use this pattern. Basically, though, this is what you do.

Cut out all the square pattern pieces and lay them out in a grid pattern. Each square has two numbers in the top left corner. The first number tells you which row the square is in, and the second indicates the position in that row, from left to right. So square 1,1 is the top left hand square. Square 3,2 is in the third row from the top and is the second square from the left.

You can see in the photo below how I have assembled the pattern and highlighted each piece in my size. The pocket pieces are one size only.

You need to cut mirror images of pieces 1, 2, 5 and 6 from your main fabric. This is because you need each piece for both the right and left sides of your body. You can do this in two ways. First, you can fold your fabric in half, lay your pattern pieces on top and cut both mirrored pieces at once. Alternatively, you can keep your fabric flat. Lay your pattern piece on the fabric right side up and cut the first piece. Then turn your pattern piece so that it is right side down and cut the second piece. Whichever method you choose, remember to align the grainline of the pattern with the grainline of your fabric. Remember to trace the sewing line, and add seam allowances. Apart from seams E and I, which will be folded over twice, all the other seams will be enclosed so an allowance of 1.5cm/ 1/2” should be ample. Use a larger seam allowance if you prefer. Add at least 5cm/ 2” seam allowances to edges E and I – and more if you would like the option of longer trousers. You can trim the excess fabric later, if necessary.

You also need to cut mirrored pieces of pieces 3 and 4 out of the pocket fabric in the same way.

I’ve used an obliging duvet cover, folded to the right dimensions, to demonstrate the layout of both fabric width options. First, we have the 2.25m/89” x 1.14m/45” fabric. I’ve folded it it half lengthways and laid out the pattern pieces like this:

Then there’s the 1.91m/80” x 1.52m/60” option. Again, I’ve folded the fabric in half lengthways. Here’s the recommended layout:

Then you need to lay out pieces 3 and 4 on your pocket fabric, again folded in half to produce two mirror images of each piece. I folded the piece of fabric below so that it measured 56cm/22″ x 35.5cm/14″.

You also need to cut one piece of interfacing from paper pattern piece 6, but without a seam allowance. Then cut this interfacing in half lengthways, so that you have two long, very thin strips.

Once you’ve traced your pieces, added seam allowances and cut them all out, leave them attached to the paper pattern pieces until you need them. Before you use each one, transfer the markings from the paper to the fabric using a fading fabric pen or dressmaker’s chalk. Then zigzag stitch around all the edges, to prevent fraying.

That’s it for this week! Next week you’ll be assembling the trouser fronts – including the pockets.

Madeleine

What fabrics are you working with? I’d love to see these in a range of different choices, and to see what people have picked out for their pockets!

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers is published – and we have a winner!

I’m delighted to announce that the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers trouser pattern is now available via my Etsy shop.

A copy of the brand new trouser pattern will be winging its way to Amanda Topps, who left a comment about them in another post. Happy sewing!

Introducing Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers

Like many others, I greet the autumn with wool in hand, my to-knit list growing faster than I get get through it. But by the time December arrives, my appetite for knitting is sated somewhat, and I start planning my New Year sewing.

I love to sew in the cold and crisp new year. The winter is the only time when I can fully turn my back on the garden, and so any spare daylight hours can be given over, guilt free, to sewing. We light the big stove in the dining room and I’m happy in there all day, cutting and pressing at the big table before moving to the armchair in the bay to hand finish garments in the last of the afternoon light.

I do almost all our sewing for the year in the winter months. By February, the emphasis is very much on summer clothing: simple cotton frocks and skirts and whatever else is needed. I like to have an easy quilt on the go, so that I can make a block here or there when a spot of making is required and I don’t have time to dive into dressmaking. But in January, you’ll usually find me making any winter clothes that my wardrobe is lacking. And this year, what was lacking was most definitely a warm pair of versatile trousers.

These trousers are inspired by all those button-up trousers that men wear in period dramas – you know, the pale beige trews sported by Mr Darcy and his friend Bingley, for example. Rather than a complicated fit involving a fly, or the unflattering bulk of an elastic waist, I wanted a simple button front. I also wanted a appealing cut, and the simple lines of peg trousers look elegant on everyone, in my opinion. The beauty of this design is that the button closure, combined with the easy fit of the peg style, means that you don’t have to worry about fit. Simply make your trousers in the correct size, try them on, and sew the buttons in the right place for a perfect fit. Trouser fitting doesn’t get any easier than this.

I made my first pair of these last winter, from a gorgeous dotted chambray, using scraps of Liberty Maybelle for the pockets. As you can see from the photos, they look equally good styled for older and younger models. The lovely Ella wore them in a way I never would, and I loved their funked-up cool. In fact, I loved them so much that I wanted a version to carry me through the cooler months, so made another pair from a soft wool tweed. They work equally well in any soft and drapey fabric and are ridiculously comfortable. What’s more, they look good with everything. Dress them up with heels for work, or down with boots, pumps or sandals for home. Make the pockets from scraps of something beautiful, as they do peek out in the most delightful way. They also provide the all-important modesty needed with button-up trousers, ensuring that there’s no chance of an unfortunate gaping moment. And because these are a feminine take on the style, and we all know who was really in charge in that particular marriage, I’ve named them after Miss Elizabeth Bennett as was.

This is very much a beginner trouser pattern. If you can sew straight lines and curves on a machine, you can make these. There is some pleating involved around the waistline, and pockets to insert, but these are clearly explained. As you might expect, I’ve put together a fully-photographed tutorial which will be published beginning in January on this blog, and will remain freely available thereafter.

I’d like to run a little giveaway for this pattern, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a free copy, please leave a comment below. To be eligible to win, you need to tell me who you are making the trousers for, and whether or not they will be your first pair. The deadline for entries is midnight (GMT) on Wednesday 9 January 2019. I’ll announce the winner on Thursday 10 January, which is also the day that the pattern will become available in my Etsy shop. The tutorials will be published over four Fridays from Friday 11 January.

Madeleine

Who would you make these trousers for? Will they be your first pair? Leave a comment answering both these questions to be eligible to win a free copy of the pattern.

A small, sustainable wardrobe: sticking to the plan

A series about the clothes we wear and the impact they have both on us and the world around us.

***

Do you like my new trousers? I did, about three weeks ago, when I had envisaged several days of leisurely sewing and tutorial writing. I had thought I’d be wearing them by the time the cold really began to set in. Before the rush of Christmas (and work in the run up to Christmas) began. Before I was squeezing awards nights and advent services on top of the usual evening activities of piano lessons and swimming and ballet. But alas, thanks to some computer programming issues, I’ve not been able to start them until this morning. Now I have a very limited timeframe to make them and photograph the tutorial and test the pattern. I’m not loving those ‘trousers’ quite so much any more.

The temptation to just go into town and buy a pair is pretty strong. I could combine it with a trip to the big central library, and have tea and cake with my mum. We could have a little wander around the lovely medieval streets of York and drink in the Christmassy ambience (and maybe some mulled wine). I could simply hand over some money and a lovely new pair of warm woollen trousers would be mine. There must be a nice pair out there somewhere.

If I’m honest, I haven’t even looked, because if I did find some, the temptation to buy them would be pretty strong. Today I am wearing a pair of Seb’s age 12-13 navy M&S tracksuit bottoms, because my other (mended!) pair of trews is in the wash and trousers are what I need to wear today. Fortunately, they are warm and comfy. Unfortunately, they are not quite my style. And while I would happily be seen in public in them (I wore them to the pool last night), it’s not an image I’m all that keen to cultivate.

The thing about trying to have a small, sustainable wardrobe is that it involves trying to stick to the plan even when the plan fails. And in our have-it-now age, that can be tricky. So I’ve reminded myself of why I’m going to stick to the plan. Why it matters. Because knowing that something actually matters is always my very best motivator.

  1. I’ve already bought the fabric. If I buy a pair of trousers, I’ll have a load of obsolete fabric sitting around. For some people, this is just stash; for me, it’s a waste.
  2. Even if I do buy some other trousers, I’ll probably use the fabric I’ve already bought to write and photograph the tutorial at some point. Which will result in two pairs of trousers, when I only need one.
  3. I do actually have the time to get it all done. I just need to get my head down and not stop until I get there. 
  4. I know that I never like ready-made clothes as much as homemade ones. I have got so used to my own fit, my own details, my own choice of fabrics and finishes that I find fault with even the nicest shop-bought clothes.
  5. Honestly? I don’t value shop-bought clothes as much as home made clothes. I know, I know. Even though I appreciate that someone, somewhere in the world put effort into making the garment, I am much more likely to donate it when a better alternative comes along. Given that I’ve got to make a pair of trousers anyway (for the tutorial), a bought pair will most likely end up being guiltily donated sooner or later. A homemade pair, on the other hand, will be worn beyond what is probably decent and then cut up to insulate potholders or something.

(And yes, I know that I could just make the tutorial pair in another size and gift them, but I really want a pair of the trousers I designed in wool, as I love them so much in chambray.)

Whether we make our own clothes or are shopping for a more eco-friendly wardrobe, we all come up against temptations to throw the plan out the window. I suspect that shoppers often see something really lovely when they weren’t looking for it, and have to resist the temptation to take it home. Makers might spend ages on a garment and then be really disappointed by the fit or finish. Sometimes it does us good to change our minds and deviate from the plan. They are our plans, after all.

But I’m sticking to this one, because I know that it really is the best way forward. After all, it’s just a pair of trousers. It’s only clothing, and I’m not going to end up naked if I don’t get these finished on time. So I’m going to end this post here, and get stuck into that basket of fabric and notions. With any luck, I’ll have a pair of trousers I love before too long.

Madeleine

Am I alone in finding it hard to stick to the plan sometimes? What are your pitfalls, and how do you talk yourself out of them? On the other hand, when do you go off piste?

A-line skirt sewalong part four: the hem

Welcome back to the final part of the A-line skirt tutorial. You’re nearly there: follow these steps and you will have finished your skirt!

The first thing you need to do is try your skirt on, ideally with some of the other things you will be wearing with it. This is so that you can decide precisely how long you want it to be. With the help of an assistant, try pinning it up to various lengths. When you find a length you like, ask them to use tailors’ chalk, a fabric marker or pins to mark the desired length of your skirt.

If necessary, trim your skirt fabric so that there is an even 5cm/ 2” seam allowance all the way around. (If you have less spare fabric available, make your hem thinner.)

Then turn 2cm/ 1/2” under all the way around and press. (Mine looks really wobbly, but this is an extreme close up – and it’s linen!)

Then turn a further 3cm/ 1 1/2” under and press again.

Pin this seam into place. Try the skirt on to check that the hem is even. Adjust it if necessary.

Then hand stitch the hem into place all the way around. To do this, work with your skirt inside out. Secure your knot in the seam allowance on one side of the skirt. Insert your needle under just two or three threads of the skirt.

Then push the needle into the hem. Run it along the folded edge and bring it out a centimetre or so further along.

Insert it into the skirt directly underneath where it emerges, picking up just two or three stitches.

From the right side, you should only be able to see tiny little stitches, if you look closely.

Sew all the way round, removing the pins, and then you’re done.

Give it a good press, put it on and enjoy!

Madeleine

I hope you’ve enjoyed making your skirt, and have found these tutorials helpful. Have you learned any new skills during this project?

A-line skirt sewalong part three: the zip and side seam

Welcome back to the third week of the A-line skirt sewalong! This week, we’re going to insert the zip and finish the second side seam. Invisible zips are the easiest to insert because any little wobbles are, well, invisible. Lay out your skirt right side out, so that the unattached edges B and D are on centred and on the top. The back of the skirt (piece 2) will be on the left and the front (piece 1) on the right. You can see this in the photo below.

Now lay your zip, with the invisible side (teeth hidden) facing down, at the top of edge D. Line up the top of the actual zip (not the extra tape at the top) with the top of the waistband. Line up the teeth of the zip with the sewing line of D. Pin into place. Remember to fold down and pin the protruding top end of the zip, too. In the photo below, I have pinned the zip into place but haven’t folded the top of the zip down yet.

Now, this next bit is crucial. It takes a bit of time but saves a lot more time with a seam ripper later on. Hand sew the zip into place. Use medium sized stitches. Doing this means that you’ll sew it in neatly and accurately when you get to the machine. Then remove the pins. Unzip the zip all the way, taking care not to inadvertently pull the zip-pull right off the end, or your zip will be useless.

Fix your zipper foot to the machine. The key to inserting an invisible zip invisibly is to sew as close as possible to the teeth, by actually rolling them out of the way as you sew. In the photo below, I’m pulling the teeth out of the way. The point of the pin shows you how close I’ll get to the teeth. You can achieve a really neat job if you go slowly and carefully. Your basting stitches will stop everything shifting about, so you can focus on getting as close to those teeth as possible. Stitch the zip into place from the top to the bottom. The zip pull will stop you from being able to get all the way to the bottom; just do your best. Remember to backstitch at either end.

Now you’re going to sew the other side of the zipper to the front of the skirt. Press the seam allowance of edge B towards the wrong side, so that you have a crease where the sewing line is. Lay the skirt wrong side out this time, but still with edges B and D on top. Piece 1 (the front) will be on the left and piece 2 (the back) on the right.

Zip up the zip. Mark the point where you stopped sewing on the other side of the zip, with a fabric marker or pen. (This will be the point where you couldn’t get any closer to the bottom of the zip, because the zip-pull was in the way.)

Arrange the zip so that the unsewn side of it is invisible side (teeth hidden) down on the seam allowance of B. Making sure that the tops of both ends of the waistbands line up nicely, pin it to the top of the waistband. Don’t worry about folding the top of the zip over at this stage.

Then unzip the zip again. Aligning the teeth to the sewing edge of B, pin it into place from top to bottom. Make sure that you only pin the zip to the seam allowance, and not the outside of the skirt.

Check that you’ve positioned the zip correctly by arranging the skirt pieces as if they were all sewn up. The zip should be enclosed within the skirt, with the pull on the outside. If it’s incorrect, now’s the time to change it. If it’s correct, fold down the top of the zip, and hand sew the zip into place. Remove all the pins as you go. Zip it up and down again, just to check that everything is nicely aligned.

Using the machine, sew it into place, just as you did for the other side of the zip. Take your time and get as close to the teeth as you can. Stop when you reach the mark you made.

Now zip up the zip and turn your skirt inside out. Pushing the unsewn bottom part of the zip up and out of the way, insert a pin to hold the seam BD together along the sewing line. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below. The pin needs to go as close as possible to the bottom of the stitched down portion of the zip.

Pin the rest of seam BD along the sewing line. Sew this seam, from as close you can get from the bottom of the zip all the way to edge E, making the join as smooth as possible. It should look like this from the right side:

Then turn it inside out and press the seam open. By now, it should be looking nice and neat.

That’s it! The zip and second side seam are done! Next time, you’ll finish the hem of your skirt.

Madeleine

Have you inserted an invisible zip before? What about other types of zip? Or have you been wary of them in the past?

 

A-line skirt sewalong part two: the darts and the waistband

Hello there! Welcome back to week two of the A-line skirt sewalong. In today’s tutorial you’re going to learn how to insert darts, interface the waistband, and attach the waistband to the skirt.

The first thing you need to do is zigzag around all those edges, apart from edge E. Just set your machine to a wide zigzag stitch and whizz your way around all of your pieces. This stops the fabric unravelling. You can see that I’ve done that in the photo below.

Set your machine back to a straight stitch. Now it’s time to insert those darts into piece 2. Working on just one dart at a time, fold the fabric right sides together so that the two diagonal lines of the dart lie on top of one another. The excess fabric should be on the wrong side of the fabric, as shown below.

The trick with darts is to iron them flat, pin them along the sewing line, and sew from the fat end towards the point. Never sew all the way to the point: stop a few stitches early, leave your ends long and tie them in a granny knot. This prevents the end from puckering. You can see one of my finished darts in this photo:

Press the darts towards the centre back of the skirt:

Now you’re going to prepare the waistband. Lay your waistband (piece 3), wrong side up, along your ironing board.

Centre your interfacing, glue side down, on your waistband. The glue side is normally a bit bumpy to the touch. You should have the seam allowance of the waistband showing evenly all the way around the interfacing. You can see this in the photograph below. Following the manufacturer’s instructions, iron the interfacing onto the waistband. It’s advisable to place an old cloth between your iron and the interfacing, to protect your iron.

Now fold your waistband (piece 3) in half lengthways and wrong sides together so that seams F and G are touching. Your waistband will be the right way out. Press along the fold to create a crease. I’ve just pressed mine in the photograph below.

Sew seam BD down the left hand side only of the skirt. With right sides together, pin seam BD of the skirt fabric from top to bottom. If piece 2 is on top of piece 1, you are pinning the seam on the right.

I forgot to take a photo of this stage (sorry!), but here’s a photo of the finished seam, so you can see which side seam you are sewing. It’s the sewn, pressed and therefore slightly sticking up seam on the right. Remember, piece 2 is on top.

With right sides together, sew seam BD of the skirt fabric from top to bottom. Press seam BD open. You can see how I’ve draped the skirt over my ironing board to do this, here:

You are now going to sew the waistband to the skirt. Open out your skirt, so that it is lying right side up.

Open up your waistband. Now line up edge G of the waistband with edge C of the skirt, so that the raw edges of each are together and the stitching line of H is in line with the stitching line of D (not seam BD). The right side of the waistband should lie against the right side of the skirt. Pin seam GC. It should look just like this:

Then continue round the top of the skirt, pinning piece 3 to piece 1 along seam GA. Because the waistband is straight and the skirt is curved, you have to pull gently on the curved skirt to fit the waistband to it, like so:

Once it is pinned into place all the way along, sew all the way along the seam GC and GA. (Make sure you keep edge F out of the way.)

Now unfold the waistband, smoothing it upwards, and press seam GA and GC open on the wrong side. You want all the seam allowances to be pressed upwards towards the top of the waistband too. Then you need to fold the seam allowance on edge F down, over the interfacing, and iron it down. You can see that I’ve done all of this here:

Next, you need to fold the whole waistband in half lengthways, wrong sides together, so that F is folded down to G. It should look like a finished (but unsewn) waistband, like so:

Pin this into place.

I always like to finish my clothing by hand, as it gives such a neat finish. Sew the folded edge of F to the inside of the skirt, taking care that your stitches can’t be seen on the right side. It’s easiest to insert your needle a couple of millimetres above the folded edge of the waistband, and sew through the seam allowances hidden inside. Then bring your needle out on the folded edge of the waistband, a bit further along. Here is my needle in the middle of taking a complete stitch.

Then insert your needle a couple of millimetres above where you have just brought it out. You’ll leave a little trail of tiny stitches on the inside, and nothing at all on the outside. It should look like this on the inside:

When you fold the back of the waistband over, it should look like this from the back of the skirt

and like this from the front:

It’s beginning to look like a skirt! Next week, you’ll be inserting the zipper and finishing the other side seam.

Madeleine

How are you getting on? It’s always great to get feedback, be it questions, comments or suggestions – do let me know if these tutorials are helpful to you.

A-line skirt sewalong part one: gathering and cutting

Hello, and welcome to the first part of the A-line skirt sewalong. If you’re new to garment making and would like step-by-step support in making this simple skirt, you’ve come to the right place.

Please read all of the instructions both here and in the pattern booklet before cutting out your pieces.

This skirt looks lovely but different in all sorts of fabrics. The stiffer the fabric, the more it sticks out. I made a lovely structured version a couple of years ago in a boiled wool felt, which looked a bit Jetsons. This time, I’ve gone for a floppy but thick linen, which hangs beautifully. Choose your fabric according to what you want, but make sure that it’s sturdy enough to stand up to being sat on a lot, and firm enough that it won’t go baggy around the rear end too quickly.

Whatever you choose, wash it the way you’ll wash it after it’s made up, dry it, and iron it. Make sure that you have everything else that you need, too.

I’m going to assume that you’ve measured yourself and chosen a size, but if not, go and do that now.

The first thing that you need to do is print out one page of the pattern pieces. Then – and this is imperative – measure the little test box at the top of that the page. If it measures 5×5 cm, go ahead and print the rest of the pattern in the same way. If it doesn’t, check that your printer is set to print at 100% and try again. If the box is the wrong size, the pattern will be, too.

Next, cut out all of the pattern boxes and arrange them in a grid pattern. You’ll notice that each pattern box has two numbers in the top left corner. This indicates its place in the grid. The first number indicates the row, and the second indicates the column. The rows run from top to bottom and the columns from left to right. So box 1,1 is the top left hand box. Box 4,5 is on the fourth row from the top, fifth box from the left.

Then stick them all together. Try to be as accurate as you can, as this will affect the fit of your skirt. Obviously the odd millimetre doesn’t matter, but do your best.

Next, highlight the size that you are going to make. It is all too easy to cut out the wrong size, or sew the wrong dart.

Now you can cut out your pattern pieces. For this tutorial, I’ve laid out my pieces on a 45″ wide piece of fabric, as this is the simplest layout. Fold your fabric in half, along the grain (lengthways). Lie your pattern pieces out at shown below, with the fold of the fabric in line with the fold line on the pattern pieces. Remember to leave a seam allowance around all the other edges.

(If you want to use a 150cm/ 60″ wide piece of fabric, the layout is slightly more complex. Fold one side of your fabric in by 44cm/ 17″ and lay out one skirt piece as shown.

Then fold the other edge in by 44cm/ 17″ (they will overlap) and lay out the other pieces as shown. Make sure that you leave a seam allowance between the two skirt pieces. You need to place, cut, refold and place each pattern piece for this method, but it is more efficient than using a square 150cm/ 60″ piece of fabric.)

Pin or weigh down your pattern pieces so that they don’t move. Then, using either chalk or a fabric pen/pencil, draw around each piece (but not on the fold). This will be your sewing line.

Then draw another line (again, not on the fold) 1.5 cm or about half an inch outside of your sewing line. This will be your cutting line. You can make this seam allowance bigger or smaller as you choose. Personally, I like small seam allowances, but it can be handy to have a bigger one in case you want to let the skirt out later.

Along the bottom hem of the skirt, allow a bigger 6cm/ 2″seam allowance. This will allow for a nice deep hem, and for some flexibility when determining the final length of your skirt.

Go and have a cup of tea. When you get back, double check everything. Only then can you cut out your skirt and waistband pieces. You should also cut out your interfacing at this point.

Now you can unpin the paper piece from the back skirt, and transfer all the markings so that you know which seam is which later on. You also want to transfer the dart markings to the back pieces. I do this by poking a hole in the paper at several points in the dart, making dots on the fabric through the holes, and then joining the dots. Then unfold your fabric piece and flip your pattern piece over to transfer all the markings to the other half the back skirt piece. Remember that there’s a dart on the other half of the back, too.

Phew – that’s the hardest bit done. Next time, we’ll be putting in the darts and attaching the waistband.

 

The A-Line skirt pattern is now available!

It is with no small amount of excitement that I’m writing to let you know that my first ever dressmaking pattern is now for sale! You can find it in my Etsy shop. I cannot begin to tell you how much I’ve learned through this process – in fact, it could be the subject of another whole series. For now, allow me to share a couple more images with you.

We took the photos while we were on a family holiday in Derbyshire this half term. My parents booked the most beautiful house for all 14 of us, and this was the view from the kitchen windows:

So naturally it became the location for a little photoshoot. The stone steps with flowerbeds take you down from the back of the house to the lawn.

I had planned to give this skirt to Fliss, but having styled it for the photoshoot I think it’ll be filling a skirt-shaped hole in my wardrobe until I try out another pattern. It is as elegant and easy to wear as I remembered – perhaps even a little more so.

We had such a lovely time, pottering about and having a little outing every day. One day most of us went down a local mine. Another – rainbow-filled – day we spent in the grounds of Chatsworth:

And my personal highlight was our visit to Haddon Hall. I’d never been there before and I was blown away. I’ve been to a LOT of stately homes and never seen anything like this. No wonder they shoot so many period films there. I’m going to write a post all about it next week, but for now let me share just a glimpse here and there…

When we got home, I spent a couple of days finalising the pattern pdfs for the Little Flurries jumper and the A-Line skirt, before doing more pottering around my own house and garden. The week culminated in a big 40th birthday party of a friend, which meant a night away in Harrogate, before starting the Christmas knitting in front of the fire (and Doctor Who, of course) yesterday. It has been such a lovely holiday, and I feel refreshed and ready for the next couple of months.

But for now, let me leave you with one last photo of the skirt. The sewalong begins tomorrow, and you’ll find full photographed tutorials to accompany the pattern published every Tuesday in November. Do let me know if you make one, and how you get on. It’s always a pleasure to hear from you!

Madeleine

Do you have a good basic skirt pattern in your collection? Which patterns do you turn to again and again?