Preparing for spring

Over the past few years, I’ve come to make the winter months precious by filling them with winter-only activities. Come spring, I’ll be needed in the garden, and I’d like to immerse myself in a fleece or two on rainy days. That means that there won’t be much – if any – time for knitting. So I’m doing a little pre-spring cleaning, and using up the bits and pieces left over from other makes.

So far, three such projects have graced my needles: a long-awaited (we’re talking years) tea cosy for our house, a pair of colourful wrist warmers and the start of a sweet little bonnet for a soon-to-be-born little person. I started the bonnet on Sunday afternoon while watching a film with the girls and went wrong twice before finally reading the pattern properly. I have to say, I didn’t mind a bit. I was so cosy, wrapped up on the couch in front of the fire, and working on something so small that it was the work of an hour to pull it out and start again. The yarn is leftover from the socks I designed, with the idea that the busy new parents will be able to throw it in the machine when it gets grubby. I’ve been there.

The wrist warmers were a bit of a slog, if I’m honest. Not because they were hard (they aren’t) but because there were three yarns used in every colourwork row, so I had to keep dropping and picking up two of them. They were one of those projects that I had to set an end date for. I’m glad I did, though, because Fliss loves them and I’ve set them aside for next Christmas.

Bringing me the most pleasure, though, is the new tea cosy in my life. This is going to sound ridiculous, but why did I not know how effective these things are? They keep the tea piping hot for ages, even in our somewhat chilly house. I used a pattern from this book, and have plans to make little birds with the last of my leftover scraps. More Christmas presents, you see. The pile on the present shelf is growing, as there have been some little sewing additions too, of late, and it is so satisfying to reach for a gift you made a few months earlier with just that person in mind. Come next Christmas, it really will feel as though the elves had made it all.

With the lengthening days, the urge to read about the natural world has come again, and I found myself scanning the library nature writing section. In the end, I plumped to reread The Shepherd’s Life. We’ll be going to the Lake District in the spring, and journeying through its pages feels almost like setting off on that little jaunt a few weeks early.

I love having so much to look forward to, but instead of thinking I can’t wait, I find that really, I can. I can because I have so much to enjoy doing between now and then. Next up will be another pair of wrist warmers, and a second snood, and perhaps even a second little bonnet to tuck away for another, as-yet-unknown baby. A few little birds might find their way into the children’s rooms. There are winter walks to enjoy, still, before reading about the rest of the year indoors, in the warm. Come the spring, I’ll be out there all the time, with my hands in the cool dark soil. For now, though, I’m preparing for spring in the most pleasurable ways I know.

Madeleine

Joining in with Ginny’s Yarn Along at Small Things

How are you preparing for spring? Or is it not on your mind just yet?

Winter Flora publication – and we have a winner!

Thank you so much for your comments on the Introducing Winter Flora post. I’m delighted to announce that the winner of the pattern is Cathy. A copy of the pattern will be landing in your inbox later today.

The pattern is now available in my Ravelry and Etsy shops.

Madeleine

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part four: adding the waistband and fastenings, and finishing the hems

Welcome to the fourth and final part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. It’s now time to attach the waistband and fastenings, fit the trousers and finish the bottom hems.

First, you are going to prepare the waistband. Taking one piece of the waistband at a time, arrange the interfacing so that it is lying on the bottom half of the main fabric, on the wrong side, within the seam allowance. The interfacing should butt up along the horizontal centre line of the waistband piece. It should be glue (bumpy) side down. Using a pressing cloth to protect your iron, and following the manufacturer’s instructions, iron the interfacing into place.

With right sides together,pin edges U together.

Make sure that the interfacing runs along the bottom of both pieces.  Sew and press seam UU open.

Seam UU is the centre back of the waistband. Then turn edge S down so that it meets edge T, and press the long horizontal fold.

Open out the waistband again. Arrange your trousers, right sides out, so that the back is facing upwards. Lay the waistband along the top of the trousers, right side down, aligning seam UU with seam KK. The raw edge of the waistband (T) should align with the raw edge of the trousers (BG).

Start to pin the waistband to the trousers, working your way around from the centre back (UU). Keep going until you go past piece 5. Open out the pocket (pieces 3 and 4 and keep pinning.

Stop at the point where the pocket fabric meets the trouser fabric of piece 1 (seam NA).

Measure a further 2cm/ 0.75” and cut the waistband here.

Keep the short cut-off piece of waistband for later. Repeat on the other side.

Use your tailors’ chalk or fabric marker to mark the point where the waistband meets piece 1, on both the wrong and right sides of the fabric. This marks your sewing line; the further 2cm/ 0.75” is your seam allowance. Take out the final pin so that you can work with the cut end of the waistband. Snip your length of ribbon in two, and fold half of it to form a loop. Pin the ribbon loop to the right side of the cut waistband. The cut ends of the ribbon should overhang the cut end of the waistband, and it should be a quarter of the way from the top of the waistband (not including seam allowances). In other words, it should be in the centre of the interfacing, but on the right side.

Your ribbon loop will be sewn along the seam line. Make sure that your loop is big enough to accommodate your chosen button. Adjust if necessary. Sew the ribbon into place along the seam line.

Repeat on the other side of the waistband.

Now take one of your discarded lengths of cut-off waistband. (It should be easily long enough to cover the gap between your two cut ends of waistband – check that it is.) Arranging it in the same way as the pinned length of waistband (wrong side up, the raw edge of the waistband (T) aligning with the raw edge of the trousers (BG)), pin the cut end to the cut end of the pinned section of the waistband, wrong sides together. This is what it looks like with the seam allowance turned towards the new piece of waistband…

and here it is with the seam allowance flipped the other way.

Sew along the seam line. Zigzag the raw ends. Press this seam open.

Now pin the new length of waistband along the front of the trousers, until it meets the other cut edge of waistband. Taking care to ensure that it will be the right length to lie flat along the top of the trousers, pin these two ends of the waistband together at the sewing line, and sew. Zigzag the raw ends, press this seam open, and pin it down.

I’m afraid I forgot to take a photo of this until after I’d sewn the waistband to the trousers – so if you’re wondering why you can see those stitches, that’s why! Just ignore them…

Sew the waistband to the top of the trousers all the way along edge T of the waistband. Use the top of the interfacing to guide you.

This is what your waistband will look like when you’ve finished sewing…

and this is what it looks like when you flip it upwards.

Next, you need to hand finish the inside of the waistband. Press seam TH/G up towards inside of the waistband. Press the seam allowance of edge S inwards, wrong sides together. It should look like this before it is folded over:

Pin it down to the inside of the trousers so that all the raw edges of the waistband are contained neatly inside the waistband. It should look like this:

Sew seam SB/G by hand from the inside of the trousers. Make sure that your stitches are invisible from the outside. This is easiest if you sew edge S down to the seam allowances already there, rather than to the outside of the trousers. Here are my trousers with the waistband finished off, and folded as you are supposed to wear them:

Attach the buttons. Try your trousers on. They will look like clown trousers, with an enormous waist! Fold the pockets inside so that edge A roughly meets edge P. Adjust until there is an equal fold on either side of the centre front of the trousers, and they feel comfortable around the waist. See where the end of the loop meets the waistband, and mark with a pin.

 Take them off, and make sure that the pins are both an equal distance from the side seams. Adjust as necessary, then sew on your buttons in the places marked by the pins. (My waistband needs another press…)

Finish the bottom hems. Try your trousers on again. Fold up edges E and I until the trousers are the length you like. (They look really nice about an inch above the ankle.) Mark this length with a few pins. Turn the trousers inside out. Mark your desired length on the inside of the trousers with your tailors’ chalk or fabric marker. Mark another line 5cm/ 2” below this, and trim the excess fabric away. Zigzag the bottom of the trousers again.

Then turn the seam allowance under by 2cm/ 3/4” and press.

Fold it over a further 3cm/ 1 1/4”, press and pin (this should take them to your desired length).

Hand sew seams E and I using ladder stitch. (To do this, you simply catch a couple of threads of the outside of the trousers:

then take a bigger stitch along the inside of the hem:

before picking up a couple of threads from the outside of the trousers again.)

All done!

Wear your new trousers with pride. And rest assured that they are incredibly easy to adjust should you gain or lose weight – you just need to move the buttons…


Introducing Winter Flora

Winter has most definitely arrived in the UK. This is what my garden looked like this morning:

and now it is hung with freezing fog.

I, for one, am rather pleased with this cold spell. The frozen cobwebs and candied blades of grass are magic enough to make cold toes and fingers bearable. We don’t get many days when the temperature stays below freezing through all the daylight hours and each leaf, each twig, each little bit of gravel is locked in a perpetual dawn.

No matter how cold it gets, there are flowers out there to brighten my day. Last autumn, for the very first time, I planted little winter violas in the hanging baskets, and their purple blooms greet me every time I come home. The children were incredulous that they would last all winter, but there they are, flowering on either side of our front door. I am looking forward to a rush of new growth in the spring.

Much older are the hellebores and snowdrops, planted under the old apple tree soon after we moved in. It’s a tricky little bed, shaded and drought-ridden thanks to the tree but directly outside our patio windows. Of course, it’s the winter and spring flowers that do best there, and the nodding hellebores are one of my very favourite. Modest and demure, they wait the winter out with quiet stoicism, eyes to the ground, adorned in gentle purples and pinks and creams. Nearby, the snowdrops have been appearing almost overnight, unnoticed until they ring their little white bells. They are both the sort of flowers that you have to look for, crouch down by, gently lift to admire their blooms. Winter flora, even in the midst of all this frost.

These little dabs of colour are such a joy in the midst of the grey that so characterises the British winter. And, it seems, no month is greyer than February. January I can like, with its energy and sense of renewal – and my birthday. But February? February needs a little colour.

So what better way to celebrate the colour and beauty outside the back door, than to bring a bit of it inside to work on by the fire? This month’s pattern celebrates the gentle colours and delicate shapes of my two favourite winter flowers. I’ve laid them in a bed of moss, with moss stitch borders at either end to complete the illusion. Laid flat, the flowers are clearly depicted, but once on, the design is more subtle.

Unlike all my patterns to date, this is not for beginners, and there will be no tutorial. This snood isn’t very complicated to make, but you do need to know how to knit with two colours at once, twist in your yarns as you go, and read a simple chart.

I really enjoyed designing this project. I started it on Christmas morning, working out the chart in an old maths book, and finished it in the car on the way to my birthday weekend. It blocked in the bathroom overnight, and we took these photos on our walk the following day, when the sun popped out unexpectedly for all of twenty minutes. Of course, I wore it the ‘wrong’ way up, as the snowdrops are meant to face downwards. I even managed to photograph it upside down… But we didn’t see the sun again for a few days, by which time it had been parcelled up and sent to my sister in law for her own special birthday. So these are the photos I have.

I have enough yarn upstairs to make another, so that’s what I’ll be doing in February. Knitting with colour, running the soft yarn through my fingers, and enjoying every tiny detail of the winter flora. And then having something new to wear for those tricky final weeks of winter, when spring seems so long in coming.

Madeleine

The pattern will be published in my Etsy shop and my Ravelry shop next Thursday, 7 February 2019. It calls for Drops Alpaca yarn – one ball of each colour 7238, 0100 and 3800 – and a 3.5 mm circular needle.

I would like to give away a copy of the pattern, so if you’d like to enter a little giveaway, please leave a comment at the end of this post by midnight GMT on Wednesday 6 February. I’ll announce the winner on Thursday 7 February.

What are you knitting at the moment? Are you reaching for the colour, too? I’m looking forward to sharing my other knitting projects with you next week.

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part three: inserting the back darts and joining the four leg pieces

Welcome to the third part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. Now that the front pieces are assembled, you are going to prepare the back pieces and attach them to the corresponding front pieces. Just you you did last week, please repeat each instruction for the other side of the trousers.

First of all, you need to insert the darts in piece 2. Make sure that you’ve accurately transferred your markings to your fabric. If you are new to darts, I strongly recommend marking them on the wrong side of the fabric as well, so that you can see the line that you are sewing along.

Working on just one dart at a time, fold the fabric right sides together so that the two diagonal dart lines lie on top of one another. The excess fabric should be on the wrong side of the fabric. The trick with darts is to iron them flat, pin them along the sewing line, and sew from the fat end towards the point. Here is my pinned dart. I’ve used a horizontal pin to mark the end of the dart.

Never sew all the way to the point (stop a few mm before you get there), or back stitch at the point; just leave your ends long and tie them in a granny knot. This prevents the point from puckering. You can see my finished dart, with long ends at the bottom, here.

When you’ve completed both darts, press them towards the centre back seam. Here are my completed darts.

It’s now time to attach piece 1 to piece 2 along the side seam. Lay out piece 2, right side up. Find which piece 1 goes with it by laying them on top, wrong side up. The correct piece is the one on which edge F is aligned with edge H, when they are placed right sides together like this. Pin and sew seam FH from the top to the bottom, so that the top is lined up perfectly even if the bottom isn’t. You will need to ensure that the pocket extension piece (piece 5) is straight. You can see my pinned pieces here.

Then press this seam open, as I’ve done in the photo below.

Now that each leg of the trousers is constructed, you’ll be working with the both legs at once as you sew them together.

Sew the legs together along the crutch seam. Arrange the trouser legs so that they are both still wrong sides out and right sides facing, with each piece 1 on top. Place them next to each other in an ‘A’ shape so that edges CK, which will be lying on top of each other in each leg, are facing each other at the top of the ‘A’. You can see mine laid out like this in the photo below.

Pin edge C of the left leg to edge C of the right leg. Starting from the top of the trousers, sew seam CC towards and ending at the end of the curve (the crotch point). In the photo below, you can see my pinning and I am pointing at the point that I am going to sew to. Do not sew on down the trouser leg.

Turn the trousers over, and repeat these steps for seam KK. Here is my pinned seam KK, and again, I am pointing at the point to which I am going to sew.

Press both seams open, taking care not the distort the curves.

Next, you’re going to sew the trouser inseams. Lay out your trousers, still wrong sides out, so that pieces 1 are on top again. They should look like this:

Align where all four parts of the trouser legs meet at the crotch, and pin. Pin seam DJ on one leg. In the photo below, you can see that I’ve pinned this seam on one leg. The scissors are pointing at the crotch point.

Sew from the crotch point towards edges E and I. It’s important that you sew both seams in this downwards direction. Repeat for seam DJ on the other leg. Press both seams open, as shown in the photo below.

Turn your trousers the right way out, and admire! They should look like trousers with a really big waistline. If you gather the top, they will look like mine do in the photo below.

That’s all for this week. Next week, you’ll be finishing the trousers by adding the waistband and fastenings, and finishing the bottom hems.

Madeleine

How are you getting on? Is this your first pair of trousers, or are you an old hand?

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part two: assembling the pockets and trouser fronts

Welcome to the second part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. This week you are going to construct each trouser leg separately before sewing them together. For each of the following instructions, repeat them for the other leg.

First of all, you need to insert the pleat in piece 1. Lay piece 1 out with the right side facing upwards. Bring the two solid lines together until they meet, directly on top of the dotted line. Press this (box) pleat, making sure that it is even on the back. Pin this:

and sew down (horizontally), using a straight stitch within the seam allowance, but very close to your marked sewing line.

Now it’s time to construct the pockets. Find the pieces 1 and 4 that face this way, right sides up:

With right sides together, pin and sew pieces 1 and 4 together along seam NA, stopping at #. Start from the top of the trouser front/ pocket, and sew downwards. Here they are pinned:

and sewn:

Now find pieces 3 and 5 that face this way, right side up:

With right sides together, pin and sew pieces 3 and 5 together along seam LP, stopping at *. These seams will feel strange – a bit unevenly matched and bulky. It’s just because they are slightly different curves and lengths. Just pin them carefully. It’s really important that you don’t pull on the fabric when you are sewing curves, as they stretch out of shape quite easily. To combat this, pin them pieces really carefully and feed them gently and slowly through the machine, without pulling on them. You could even hand sew them loosely first, for extra security. It will look nice and flat when you open it out. Here they are pinned:

and sewn:

Next, you need to attach your pocket lining to your pocket piece. Attach pieces 3 and 4 by pinning and sewing seam MO with right sides together. Here they are side by side:

and sewn:

Now arrange the fabric, right side up, so that edge A meets edge P. The pocket fabric should lie beneath the trouser front.

Finally, pin and sew between # and * of the pocket pieces. (Do not attach the pocket pieces to the trouser front at this point.) In this photo, it’s the bit between the pins.

Press all your seams. If you really want to, you can understitch the seams where your pocket meets the trouser fabric, to stop the pocket fabric from rolling out. But I don’t like to: the pockets are made to gape slightly and show off the pocket fabric.

Madeleine

What fabrics have you chosen for your pockets? I’d love to know!

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial part one: preparation and cutting out

Welcome to the first part of the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers tutorial. This week you’re going to assemble the paper pattern, choose your size and cut out your fabric pieces.

Before you begin, please make sure that you’ve washed and ironed your fabric. That way your beautiful new trousers won’t shrink and warp the first time you put them through the wash.

Now measure yourself (or whoever the intended recipient is), and choose the right size. Please don’t get hung up on what size you normally are in the shops; just go for whichever hip and waist size best describes you.

Now you’re ready to assemble the paper pattern. There are full instructions attached to the paper pattern – please do take the time to read them. They are entitled How to use this pattern. Basically, though, this is what you do.

Cut out all the square pattern pieces and lay them out in a grid pattern. Each square has two numbers in the top left corner. The first number tells you which row the square is in, and the second indicates the position in that row, from left to right. So square 1,1 is the top left hand square. Square 3,2 is in the third row from the top and is the second square from the left.

You can see in the photo below how I have assembled the pattern and highlighted each piece in my size. The pocket pieces are one size only.

You need to cut mirror images of pieces 1, 2, 5 and 6 from your main fabric. This is because you need each piece for both the right and left sides of your body. You can do this in two ways. First, you can fold your fabric in half, lay your pattern pieces on top and cut both mirrored pieces at once. Alternatively, you can keep your fabric flat. Lay your pattern piece on the fabric right side up and cut the first piece. Then turn your pattern piece so that it is right side down and cut the second piece. Whichever method you choose, remember to align the grainline of the pattern with the grainline of your fabric. Remember to trace the sewing line, and add seam allowances. Apart from seams E and I, which will be folded over twice, all the other seams will be enclosed so an allowance of 1.5cm/ 1/2” should be ample. Use a larger seam allowance if you prefer. Add at least 5cm/ 2” seam allowances to edges E and I – and more if you would like the option of longer trousers. You can trim the excess fabric later, if necessary.

You also need to cut mirrored pieces of pieces 3 and 4 out of the pocket fabric in the same way.

I’ve used an obliging duvet cover, folded to the right dimensions, to demonstrate the layout of both fabric width options. First, we have the 2.25m/89” x 1.14m/45” fabric. I’ve folded it it half lengthways and laid out the pattern pieces like this:

Then there’s the 1.91m/80” x 1.52m/60” option. Again, I’ve folded the fabric in half lengthways. Here’s the recommended layout:

Then you need to lay out pieces 3 and 4 on your pocket fabric, again folded in half to produce two mirror images of each piece. I folded the piece of fabric below so that it measured 56cm/22″ x 35.5cm/14″.

You also need to cut one piece of interfacing from paper pattern piece 6, but without a seam allowance. Then cut this interfacing in half lengthways, so that you have two long, very thin strips.

Once you’ve traced your pieces, added seam allowances and cut them all out, leave them attached to the paper pattern pieces until you need them. Before you use each one, transfer the markings from the paper to the fabric using a fading fabric pen or dressmaker’s chalk. Then zigzag stitch around all the edges, to prevent fraying.

That’s it for this week! Next week you’ll be assembling the trouser fronts – including the pockets.

Madeleine

What fabrics are you working with? I’d love to see these in a range of different choices, and to see what people have picked out for their pockets!

Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers is published – and we have a winner!

I’m delighted to announce that the Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers trouser pattern is now available via my Etsy shop.

A copy of the brand new trouser pattern will be winging its way to Amanda Topps, who left a comment about them in another post. Happy sewing!

Introducing Mrs Darcy Wears the Trousers

Like many others, I greet the autumn with wool in hand, my to-knit list growing faster than I get get through it. But by the time December arrives, my appetite for knitting is sated somewhat, and I start planning my New Year sewing.

I love to sew in the cold and crisp new year. The winter is the only time when I can fully turn my back on the garden, and so any spare daylight hours can be given over, guilt free, to sewing. We light the big stove in the dining room and I’m happy in there all day, cutting and pressing at the big table before moving to the armchair in the bay to hand finish garments in the last of the afternoon light.

I do almost all our sewing for the year in the winter months. By February, the emphasis is very much on summer clothing: simple cotton frocks and skirts and whatever else is needed. I like to have an easy quilt on the go, so that I can make a block here or there when a spot of making is required and I don’t have time to dive into dressmaking. But in January, you’ll usually find me making any winter clothes that my wardrobe is lacking. And this year, what was lacking was most definitely a warm pair of versatile trousers.

These trousers are inspired by all those button-up trousers that men wear in period dramas – you know, the pale beige trews sported by Mr Darcy and his friend Bingley, for example. Rather than a complicated fit involving a fly, or the unflattering bulk of an elastic waist, I wanted a simple button front. I also wanted a appealing cut, and the simple lines of peg trousers look elegant on everyone, in my opinion. The beauty of this design is that the button closure, combined with the easy fit of the peg style, means that you don’t have to worry about fit. Simply make your trousers in the correct size, try them on, and sew the buttons in the right place for a perfect fit. Trouser fitting doesn’t get any easier than this.

I made my first pair of these last winter, from a gorgeous dotted chambray, using scraps of Liberty Maybelle for the pockets. As you can see from the photos, they look equally good styled for older and younger models. The lovely Ella wore them in a way I never would, and I loved their funked-up cool. In fact, I loved them so much that I wanted a version to carry me through the cooler months, so made another pair from a soft wool tweed. They work equally well in any soft and drapey fabric and are ridiculously comfortable. What’s more, they look good with everything. Dress them up with heels for work, or down with boots, pumps or sandals for home. Make the pockets from scraps of something beautiful, as they do peek out in the most delightful way. They also provide the all-important modesty needed with button-up trousers, ensuring that there’s no chance of an unfortunate gaping moment. And because these are a feminine take on the style, and we all know who was really in charge in that particular marriage, I’ve named them after Miss Elizabeth Bennett as was.

This is very much a beginner trouser pattern. If you can sew straight lines and curves on a machine, you can make these. There is some pleating involved around the waistline, and pockets to insert, but these are clearly explained. As you might expect, I’ve put together a fully-photographed tutorial which will be published beginning in January on this blog, and will remain freely available thereafter.

I’d like to run a little giveaway for this pattern, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a free copy, please leave a comment below. To be eligible to win, you need to tell me who you are making the trousers for, and whether or not they will be your first pair. The deadline for entries is midnight (GMT) on Wednesday 9 January 2019. I’ll announce the winner on Thursday 10 January, which is also the day that the pattern will become available in my Etsy shop. The tutorials will be published over four Fridays from Friday 11 January.

Madeleine

Who would you make these trousers for? Will they be your first pair? Leave a comment answering both these questions to be eligible to win a free copy of the pattern.

Under the Ice socks knitalong part four: working the leg

Welcome to the fourth and final part of the Under the Ice socks tutorial. This week you’re going to work the leg and weave in those ends.

At the end of the last tutorial, you had just finished turning the heel. Now you need to place a stitch marker (to mark the start of each new round). I’ve used a scrap of white wool.

Then you need to knit two rounds, still working in the blue yarn. You’ll notice that there’s a little hole on either side of the heel. Don’t worry about this; we’ll deal with it later.

After two rounds of blue, it’s time to start striping. Insert your right needle into the first stitch of the next round, ready to knit. Lay your white yarn over your right needle, so that the tail is on the left.

Knit the first few stitches. You may need to go back and pull your ends tight. Carry on all the way around.

Then you need to pick up your blue yarn and start working with it again. Just pick it up and knit with it.

Make sure that your working white yarn runs up the inside of the sock.

After the specified number of rounds of blue, it’s time to knit with the white yarn again. Now, because you’ve knit a few rounds of blue, you don’t want to pull the white yarn too tight, or you’ll cause ruching up the side of your sock. So make sure that you leave enough white yarn to run up the inside of your sock and cover the distance of those blue rows.

Knit the specified number of rows of white.

Carry on in this way until you have finished the striping section.

Then cut your blue yarn, leaving a long tail.

Tuck the tail inside your sock and continue to knit, in white, until the leg is 2″ shorter than you want the finished sock to be.

Now it’s time to add the ribbing at the top of the sock. Knit the first two stitches, as usual.

Bring your working yarn to the front of your work, ready to purl:

and purl the next two stitches. Then move your working yarn to the back again, ready to knit. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Establish a 2×2 rib all the way around the sock. You should finish on 2 purl stitches. Then work 2 inches of the ribbing, all in white. You should always find yourself knitting into the knit stitches (the ones wearing v-necks) and purling the purl stitches (those sporting turtlenecks).

Once you’ve worked all that ribbing, it’s time to bind off. When binding off in rib – and I cannot emphasise this enough – you need to keep everything very very loose indeed. Otherwise you will not be able to stretch the top of your sock enough to get it on. So throughout all of the following bind-off steps, keep everything even looser than you think it needs to be.

Knit the first two stitches.

Bind off the first stitch that you knit by lifting it over the other stitch and right over and off the end of the needle. Now, the next stitch you need to work is a purl stitch, so move your working yarn to the front. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Purl the next stitch. Your working yarn will still be at the front of your work.

Now bind off the previous (knit) stitch by lifting it over the other (purl) stitch and over and off the end of the needle. The next stitch you need to work is a purl stitch, so keep your working yarn at the front of your work.

That’s it – you just carry on working one stitch at a time and binding off the previous stitch. Remember to check what your next stitch will be and move your working yarn forwards and backwards, just as you would if you were working ribbing normally.

When you get to the last stitch, cut your yarn with a tail of about 6″ and pull it through the final stitch.

Now you need to weave all those ends in. Weave the end you’ve just cut into the inside of the ribbing. You shouldn’t really be able to see it afterwards, even from the inside. Leave a little 0.5″ – 1″tail on each of your woven-in ends until after you’ve blocked and worn it, and then snip it off when everything has settled. I’ve done this to my sock, below.

Use the long blue tail to work your way down to the heel again. Use it to close the little hole on one side of the heel. Then work your way around the heel, stitching round the short row shaping and across the base of the heel, up the short row shaping and finally closing up the little hole on the other side. There’s no need to overdo it, especially in the heel (which would be uncomfortable to wear), but closing up the little holes like this does make the sock look really professional. You can see that I’ve done this, here:

When you’ve made both of your socks, soak them for half an hour or so in tepid (lukewarm) water. Then roll them in a towel and press on it, to removed the worst of the water. Leave them, spread on something flat, to dry. Then wear them! They will block to the shape of your feet, and be sublimely comfortable.

Then cast on for the next pair…

Madeleine

How did your first sock turn out?