Little Flurries knitalong part three: the front

Welcome back to the third part of the Little Flurries knitalong. By now, you should have completed the back of the sweater. If not, just carry on with it – this tutorial will be waiting for you whenever you’re ready to get started on the front.

Just so you’re aware, I’ve used the same text and photographs for the first part of this tutorial as in the Snow Day ‘front’ tutorial. This is because the bottom of the front and the bobbles are exactly the same on both sweaters. However, unlike the Snow Day jumper, Little Flurries has a few options for the front.

Option A

If you’ve chosen option A, you just need to refer to last week’s ‘back’ tutorial to see how to create your notched hem. Bear in mind that the notches are shorter on the front than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to knit. Then work in stocking stitch (knit all the right side rows, purl all the wrong side rows) until you reach the desired length. Once you’ve done that, scroll down towards the bottom of this tutorial for instructions on how to work the envelope style neck.

Options B, C and D

For options B, C and D, you also need to know how to make bobbles. Before you do that, however, you need to create your notched hem. It’s shorter than the one for the back, but made in exactly the same way. So head on over to the tutorial for the back, and work your notched hem. Please bear in mind that the front hem is shorter than the back; the pattern tells you how many rows to work for the front.

Once you’ve finished the notched section, it’s time to start on the bobbles. Regardless of what colour your bobbles will be made in, they are all made the same way. Read the following instructions, then see the instructions on creating two tone bobbles (option C) and yellow bobbles (option D), below.

You begin by knitting however many stitches the pattern specifies for your size, in order to reach the point where you will make your first bobble. So take a moment to knit to that place, and then have a quick read of all the bobble instructions before making your first bobble.

You’re going to make a bobble out of the next stitch. In the photo below, the metal needle is pointing at the stitch that you are going to make the bobble out of.

Knit the stitch, but don’t slide it off the left needle. In the photo below, the newly knitted stitch is on the right hand needle, but the original stitch is still on the left hand needle (being held on by my index finger). You’ve just made two stitches out of one original stitch.

Put your yarn to the front of your work, so that you are ready to purl.

Now purl into the same stitch (the one that my index finger is touching in the photo above). You can see my inserted needle, ready to purl that stitch, in the photo below.

Again, don’t slide this stitch off your needle. You can now see, as in the photo below, that you have two new stitches (one knit and one purl) on your right hand needle, and still that same original stitch on your left needle (my index finger is holding it in the photo below).

Move your yarn to the back of your work again, as in the photo below.

and knit into this same stitch again, as you can see me doing below.

This time, you are finally allowed to slide that stitch off your left hand needle once you’ve knitted it. So you can see, below, that my thumb is indicating the three new stitches that we’ve made out of that single initial stitch. There’s a purl stitch in the centre, and a knit stitch on either side of it.

Okay? So you’ve turned one stitch into three. This provides the breadth of the bobble. Now we need to give it some height. To do this, we’re going to work just these three new stitches for a couple of rows of stocking stitch, as follows:

Turn your work so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front, so that you are set up like the photo below.

Purl these three stitches.

Turn your work again so that the right side is facing you, and move your yarn to the back, as you can see below.

Knit these three stitches.

Turn the work again so that the wrong side is facing you, bring your yarn to the front once more, as shown in the photo below.

Purl the same three stitches again.

Finally, turn your work so that the right side is facing, and move your yarn to the back again, as shown below.

This is the special bit. You’re going to knit all three of these same stitches together into one stitch. To do this, you literally knit the three stitches as if they were one. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below. In fact, treating all three stitches as one even makes them look as if I’m only knitting one stitch. I’m not; my needle is inserted through all three stitches knitwise (i.e. as if knitting normally) at the same time.

Wrap your working yarn to make a knit stitch as normal, move the right needle under the left as usual and slide all three stitches off the left hand needle as if you were just knitting one stitch.

That’s it! You’ve made a bobble! It’ll look more like a proper bobble once you’ve worked a couple more rows. For now, just knit a few more stitches, keeping count so that you know when to make the next bobble. In the photo below you can see that I’ve knit my bobble stitch, with all that bulk below and to the right of it, and then three more normal knit stitches.

I assure you that it’ll look much more like a proper bobble in a couple of rows’ time, at which point you’ll be able to give it a prod and a poke from behind to make it more rounded and full. For now though, just concentrate on getting to the end of the row. Remember, count your stitches and stop when it’s time to make the next bobble.

By the time you get to the end of your row, it’ll look something like this:

My empty needle is pointing at one of the bobbles.

Carry on in stocking stitch (knit the right side rows, purl the wrong side rows) for the specified number of rows, then work the next bobble row in exactly the same way. You’ll notice that on the next bobble row there are fewer bobbles and more knit stitches in between them.

Option C only

For option C, you make your bobbles in the same colour as the sleeves. In my sample, the bobbles and sleeves are in a dark teal and the body is in an aquamarine colour.

Knit the number of stitches specified before making the first bobble. You are going to make the bobble on the stitch that the empty needle is pointing to, below.

Insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if to knit. Pick up your bobble yarn, and lay it over your right needle, with the ball to your right and the tail to your left. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Using this yarn, work the bobble as explained in the instructions above. You’ll find that you need to pull the tail tight from time to time, but don’t worry if it’s a bit loose. You can make it tight when you weave all your ends in later.

Once you’ve worked the bobble, pick up your body yarn and knit the next stitch. Pull the yarn tight across the back of the bobble as you work this stitch. Then knit either 3 stitches (if there are 7 stitches between your bobbles) or 4 stitches (if there are 8 stitches between your bobbles). Now you want to carry your bobble yarn across the back of your work, so that you don’t have great dangly loops on the inside of the jumper.

Insert your right needle as if to knit, as shown below.

With your left hand, gently bring the bobble yarn across the right needle from right to left, as shown. Your tension is important here. Don’t pull it so tight that your jumper looses its stretch, and don’t leave it so loose that you’ll have a big loop at the back of your work. You’ll know when it feels about right.

Then wrap your body yarn as if to knit that stitch as normal (i.e. from left to right):

before moving your bobble yarn to the right of the needle and downwards, effectively taking it off the needle. You can see that I’ve done this in the photo below.

Then finish knitting the stitch as normal. You can see my knitted stitch below. It’s the one furthest to the left on the right hand needle. It should look like a perfectly normal knit stitch in the body yarn.

What this does is twist the bobble yarn into the body yarn at the back of your work, meaning that the bobble yarn is only carried for 3 or 4 stitches before being attached to the jumper again. This way, the loops are kept small and neat, and won’t catch on the child when they are putting the jumper on or taking it off.

Your work should look like mine, below, on the wrong side. Can you see where the bobble yarn has been used to make a bobble (just above my fingernail), and then again when it’s been carried by a normal stitch (at the right end of the work)?

Carry on in this manner until you’ve knit the final bobble of the row. You will probably find that your bobbles are all sitting on the wrong side of your work. This isn’t a problem at all. Once you’ve knit a couple more rows of stocking stitch, you’ll be able to push them through to the right side. Mine all came out on the wrong side:

but I pushed them through later.

Now you have a choice. You can either cut your bobble yarn with a nice long tail and resign yourself to weaving in lots of ends. If you’re new to carrying your yarns, that’s what I’d advise, in case you get your tension wrong on the next row. It’s only a little jumper, so there won’t be too many ends to weave in.

However, if you loathe dealing with ends (I don’t, really), you can continue to carry your bobble yarn all the way to the end of the row, making sure that you attach it to the final stitch, as I’ve done here:

Then, when you turn your work, you need to carry the yarn every few stitches but in reverse, as you will be purling your work. Then, as you work the next 8 rows of stocking stitch, be sure to twist the bobble yarn around the body yarn as you start each knit row, so that the yarn is carried up the side of the jumper. Then the bobble yarn will be in the right place when you go to knit the next bobble row. It’s up to you.

Option D only

Joining the yellow yarn to work the bobbles in a contrast colour is really easy.

Knit the specified number of stitches, working any green bobbles as specified. When you get to the place for a yellow bobble, insert your needle into that stitch as if about to knit it, as below:

and then lay your yellow yarn across your right needle with the tail on the left and the ball of yarn on the right, like so:

Take hold of your yarn and knit that first stitch, remembering not to slide the worked stitch off the needle, as you’re about to purl into that same stitch. Can you see how there’s now a yellow stitch in the photo below?

Keep on working the bobble, as normal. Don’t worry if it looks a bit loose. Mine does, in the photo below, but that’s normal. Feel free to give the tail a pull to tighten things up, and just keep working that bobble.

Once the bobble is done, snip the yellow yarn, leaving a nice long tail of 3-4 inches. You can see in the photo below that my bobble is hiding at the back of my work – again, that’s not a problem.

Knit the next stitch, as normal, and carry on as instructed by the pattern until you reach the end of your row.

My bobble ended up on the wrong side of my work, this time. Can you see it against all those purled stitches on the wrong side, below?

You would barely know it was there, from the front. All you can see in the photo below is a stitch on the needle and what looks like a purl stitch underneath it.

Poke it through from the back, just using your finger,

give those loose ends a gentle tug from the back,

and you’ll have a nice, neat, yellow bobble sitting on the right side of your work.

Don’t worry about the loose ends yet. You’ll weave them in when you make up the sweater.

All options

Carry on knitting the front of your jumper until you reach the length specified for your chosen size, or your desired length (but only if you bought extra wool to allow for extra length). For options B, C and D, don’t worry which row of the bobble-making pattern you finish on; it doesn’t matter. Just make sure that you make a wrong side (even numbered) row the last one you work.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening. This is done in exactly the same way on the front as it was on the back. Head on over to the back tutorial, and follow the instructions from where it says Working the neckline.

There you go! You’ve finished the front and back of your Little Flurries jumper! Just the sleeves to knit now – see you for that tutorial next Friday.

Madeleine

Do you like the way the bobbles look in your chosen colour(s)? Any winning combinations out there? Do make colour suggestions in the comments below!

Little Flurries knitalong part two: the back

Welcome to the second part of the Little Flurries knitalong. This week, you’re going to be working the back of the sweater. As the bottom hem of the back is identical to that of the Snow Day sweater, I’ve used the text and photos from that tutorial for the first part of this one. However, you’ll notice that the colour of the yarn changes partway through this tutorial. That’s because the neckline of Little Flurries is completely different to the neckline of Snow Day – so that part of the tutorial is brand new.

Let’s begin at the bottom hem. You’ve had a bit of practice casting on and knitting while you were making your swatch, so this should be a breeze. In fact, if you get the first 26 rows done over the weekend, you’ll have lots of lovely mindless stocking stitch to relax with in the evenings throughout the coming week.

The first thing you need to do is cast all the stitches onto your larger needle (the one you swatched for). This just makes knitting that first row much easier, as the stitches will be a bit looser than if you cast them onto your smaller needle. However, the smaller needle is used to knit the rest of the hem. So you literally hold the larger needle (with all the cast on stitches on it) in one hand, and the smaller needle in your other hand. I’m right handed and knit in the UK way, so in the photo below the cast on stitches are on the larger needle (on the left), and I’ve just started to knit them all across onto my smaller needle (on the right).

Done? Right, now before you forget, put that larger needle away and pick up the other smaller needle. You should now be working exclusively with your pair of smaller needles. The pattern tells you to knit some rows of garter stitch. Just to remind you, that means that you knit every row. Don’t purl anything.

Once you’ve knitted the required number of rows of garter stitch, you’re ready to work on the notches. In this next section, you’re going to be knitting stocking stitch in the centre of the work, and garter stitch at either end. It’s actually really easy.

You also need to start using your larger needles again. So pick up one of your large needles and use it to work all the stitches of the following row.

We start on the right side, and just knit the whole row. Put the smaller needle (that you’ve just emptied of stitches) to one side, and pick up your other larger needle. You’re going to be working with your pair of larger needles for the rest of the back. Turn your work.

Then, on the wrong side, you need to knit the first five stitches only. In the photo below, that’s precisely where I’m up to. Can you see how the first five stitches are still in garter stitch? That’s because we’re still knitting both sides of those first five stitches.

However, we want the central section to be stocking stitch, so you need to purl all the way across the row until you are five stitches before the end. Don’t forget to bring your yarn to the front of your work before you start purling, like so:

When you get to those last five stitches, stop. Move your yarn to the back of your work again, ready to knit. Then knit those last five stitches, to create the garter stitch notch on the other side of the back.

Take a look at your work, without turning it. From the wrong side, which you’ve just finished working, it will look like the photo below. Those are the first five knit stitches (on the right), and then the purl stitches stretching off to the left. There will be five more purl stitches on the far left edge of your knitting.

Turn your work, and knit the whole row. By the time you finish this row, your work should look like the photo below, on the right side (the side you’ve just finished working).

Can you see the garter notch beginning to emerge on the right hand side? Work a few more rows (in the same way as the previous two) and it’ll be much clearer:

Carry on in this manner until you’ve worked as many rows as the pattern tells you to. Then stop and have a celebratory drink/ dance/ pat on the back. That’s the hardest part of the back done.

Now all you need to do is work the rest of the back in stocking stitch until it reaches the required length (see the pattern to find out what this is in your chosen size). That means that you knit all the stitches on the right side and purl all the stitches on the wrong side. Easy.

Done that? Then it’s time to create the neckline and work that envelope opening.

Working the neckline

The first thing that you need to do is knit the garter stitch section at the front of the neckline, while keeping the shoulder sections in stocking stitch. This is much easier than casting off and picking up stitches to work a separate collar.

All you have to do on the first row is knit the whole thing. On the next row, which is a wrong side row, you need to purl the first 17 stitches. This ensures that this bit of the work will remain in stocking stitch. You can see that I’ve done this in the picture below.

Your yarn will be at the front because you’ve been purling. Move it to the back, ready to knit, like so:

and knit all the way to the last 17 stitches. In the photo below you can see the difference between the first, purled, stitches, and the knitted ones. My pencil is pointing at the first knitted stitch.

Bring your yarn to the front again:

and purl the last 17 stitches. Turn your work. It should look like the picture below, with the stitches at either end still in stocking stitch, and the garter stitch edging beginning to emerge in the middle. My pencil is pointing to the place where the change occurs.

Work the next 4 rows in the same way, knitting the right side rows and doing a combination of knit and purl stitches on the wrong side rows, as directed by the pattern. Please note that the number of stitches you purl changes each time.

Now you’re ready to cast off those centre stitches. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern. You can see that I’ve done this, below.

Then knit two more stitches. My metal needle is pointing at the stitch that we are going to bind off first (below). Can you see why you needed to knit two more stitches? If you hadn’t, you would have bound off too early.

Bind off that stitch as normal, by carrying it over the end of your right needle. In the picture below, my metal needle is pointing to the bound off stitch.

Continue to knit one stitch and then bind off the previous stitch until you’ve bound off the required number of stitches. Remember, when binding off you count each stitch as you actually bind it off, not as you knit it. When you’ve done the correct number, you should have one stitch remaining on your right needle (plus the shoulder stitches at the far end) and the number of stitches you are supposed to knit, minus one, on your left needle. You can see this in my photograph below.

Knit the rest of those stitches, and you’ll have the correct number of knit stitches on either side of the bound off section. Your work should look like the photo below. Can you see the two shoulder sections, with the bound off neckline in the middle? (Ignore the bobbles: the front neckline is worked in exactly the same way as the back, so I took these photos while working the front – hence the bobbles.)

The next thing to do is to decrease those shoulder stitches so that they can be sewn together later to form a toddler-friendly envelope neckline.

You are going to work the right shoulder (what would be the right shoulder if someone was wearing it) first. The stitches for the left shoulder will still be on your needle, but just ignore them for now.

The right shoulder actually uses slightly more complicated decreases than the left. They aren’t difficult at all, but it might take you a while to remember them as they have a few steps. However, they are important because they make the collar curve away in the correct direction as the stitches are decreased.

You start with a wrong side row. Purl the number of stitches specified by the pattern. Then stop. This is all I’ve done, below.

Now you need to make your slip, slip, purl (ssp) decrease. In order to make the decreases point in the right direction, you need to twist them by slipping them onto your right needle as if you were going to knit them. So you insert your right needle into the next stitch, as if you were going to knit it, as shown here:

and just slip it off your left needle. Do this again, and you should have two slipped (but not worked) stitches with all those purled stitches on your right needle. You can see them in the photograph below.

Next, you need to get those two stitches back onto your left needle, so that you can work them. But you don’t want to twist them back to how they were in the first place. So you need to insert your left needle into both stitches, from left to right, and slip them straight back onto the left needle. You can see how I’ve inserted my left needle to do this, below. Don’t work those stitches at all, yet.

You can see in the picture below that they are back on my left needle, in their new orientation, and not worked.

Now it’s finally time to work those two stitches. You need to insert your right needle into them ‘through the back loop’. This means that you insert your needle as if to purl, but you pick up both stitches at the same time, and you insert your needle from the left hand side at the back. It might all feel a bit tight and awkward, but persevere. You can see my right needle inserted in the picture below.

Then you just purl that stitch as normal. In the next picture, you can see that the last stitch is just a purl stitch, except that it has purled two stitches into one. That’s the slip, slip, purl stitch (ssp) done.

Move your yarn to the back of your work (as shown below) and knit the rest of the stitches. All of your wrong side rows will be worked in this manner, although the number of stitches to knit and purl varies. Just follow the pattern.

When you get to the end of the row, turn your work. Now you’re going to work the first right side row.

Knit four stitches. Now it’s time to work the slip, slip, knit stitch.

Slip the next stitch onto your right needle as if you were going to knit it – but don’t work it at all. You can see my needle, inserted as if to knit, below. We are slipping stitches knitwise again in order to twist them around – just as we did for the slip, slip, purl stitch.

Do the same for the next stitch. You can see two slipped stitches on my right needle, below.

Now you are going to knit those two stitches together, but ‘through the back loop’. You do this by inserting your left needle into both stitches at the same time, from right to left. I find it easiest to hold my needles almost parallel:

Once your left needle is inserted, move it so that your needles are perpendicular again, and knit those two stitches together as if you were knitting a normal stitch. You can see my needles in position, ready to do this, below.

Then knit the rest of the stitches in the row.

Carry on working all the wrong side rows with the ssp stitch, and the right side rows with the ssk stitch, until you only have one stitch left. Don’t be put off when you have to work an ssp at the start of a new row, or a ssk at the end of a row. Just carry on working the stitches as explained, above. Your work will decrease by one stitch in every row.

Then snip your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch, to secure it. Your right shoulder is done! It should have a nice curve, and the decrease stitches should all point outwards, as below:

Now it’s time to work the left shoulder. You start working this on the wrong side, and you need to rejoin your yarn. The first stitch is a knit stitch (even though you are working into a purl stitch), so insert your needle as if to knit, and lay your yarn across your right needle with the loose end to the left (see below). Knit the first four stitches.

Now you are going to work the ‘purl two together’ (p2tog) stitch. Bring your yarn to the front, ready to purl.

Insert your needle as you normally would to purl, but instead of just inserting it through one stitch, you need to insert it through two stitches at the same time:

Then purl those two stitches, just as if you were purling one normal stitch. That’s the end of the p2tog stitch. Now you just purl to the end of the row.

Turn your work, ready to work a right side row. Knit the number of stitches specified by the pattern, then stop.

Now it’s time to work the ‘knit two together’ (k2tog) stitch. Insert your right needle into the next two stitches at the same time, from left to right, just as if you were knitting one normal knit stitch.

Then knit the two stitches, exactly as if they were just one normal knit stitch. That’s the k2tog stitch done.

Now knit to the end of the row.

Continue working the wrong side and right side rows just like this, remembering to follow the number of knit and purl stitches for every row, because it changes. Don’t be put off when you have to purl two together at the end of a row, or knit two together at the start of a row. You just do it exactly as you’ve done it before.

Keep going until you only have one stitch left, then cut your yarn with a nice long tail and pull it through that final stitch to secure it.

The left shoulder should look like mine, below, with a tail from the joined-in yarn, and the decreases pointing off to the right.

That’s the back done! Come back next week for the knitalong tutorial for the front – time to start working those bobbles…

Madeleine

Who are you knitting your Little Flurries for? Have you gone for a Christmas tree version, or one of the other options?

 

 

 

Little Flurries – we have a winner!

I’m delighted to announce that my Little Flurries sweater pattern is now available via my Ravelry shop and also my Etsy shop! Please see this post for further details of this 1-5 years beginners’ knitting pattern.

Thank you so much to Carol and Susanne for entering my Little Flurries giveaway. As there were just a couple of entrants, it seems churlish to pick just one, so you both have a pattern on its way to you. Happy knitting!

Madeleine